Tumpik
#US history
saint-sacrilege-blog · 3 months
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Slapping the homie's ass in the dust bowl and zapping both of us across the room
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daddysakic · 28 days
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It’s weird it’s happened 10 times right?
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schmergo · 1 month
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Historical house tours are so confusing. They’ll be like, “When we head upstairs, pay special attention to the Blue Room, where Colonel Thomas J. Shmoshington carved a suggestive message on the bedpost.”
And you’ll walk into a room with bright blue walls and be like, “Oh, I guess this is the Blue Room?”
And they’ll be like, “NO! This is the Red Room! It’s called the Red Room because of the red velvet curtains and canopy bed!” Then they take you into a white room with yellow floral wallpaper trim and go, “THIS is the Blue Room!”
And when you humbly ask why it’s called the Blue Room, they’ll scoff at you like you were born yesterday (rather than in 1789) and be like, “It’s called the Blue Room because it USED TO BE blue! The entire mansion is painstakingly restored to its appearance in the year 1812, which happens to fall during the two-year span in in which Abigail Shmaddison redid the room in white and yellow in a flight of fancy. After spending some time away in a sanitarium, she regained her senses and changed it back to blue. An archaeologist found an original scrap of the yellow wallpaper beneath 13 layers of paint and we were able to match it perfectly with this pattern, which was of course developed by Q.B. Zippitydoo & Sons in London and available for purchase only in 1812. Any more questions?”
So you hold your tongue until you enter a big green room that is so incredibly green that it can’t possibly be anything but the Green Room. It has acid green walls. It has bright green curtains. It has forest green tablecloths. There are ivy motifs carved in the ceiling. Cautiously, you venture, “So this is the Green Room?”
And they say, “NO! This is the parlor!”
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aworldofpattern · 1 year
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Nikkie de Jager wears a dress paying tribute to Marsha P Johnson
...at the Met Gala 2021 - 'In America: A Lexicon Of Fashion'.
The 'P' in Johnson's name stood for 'Pay It No Mind', which can be seen embroidered on the ribbon. The flower crown references the most well-known photograph of this transgender icon.
The dress was designed by Dutch designer Edwin Oudshoorn.
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clove-pinks · 1 year
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The "War of 1812 Scented Candle", complete with miniature White House near the wick, is, I cannot emphasise this enough, AN ACTUAL REAL PRODUCT THAT YOU CAN BUY (even if it's currently sold out back in stock??).
The candle is funny enough by itself, but the ad copy on the maker's website is gold (and surprisingly astute):
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It goes on to add:
We should also note that even though the British Army DID burn Washington, it was only after Americans had burned and looted the capital of Canada, as well as a bunch of other Canadian cities. But no one ever makes a candle about that! (Including us.)
THE BEST PART AND MOST 🔥🔥🔥 TAKE:
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mysharona1987 · 7 months
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geekysteven · 3 months
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[Image description Stock photo of two business type people shaking hands. Woman on the left has Liz Truss' face, man on the right has William Henry Harrison's face]
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dailyhistoryposts · 11 months
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Cockfight (1985) by Keith Haring. Lithograph in colors.
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coolnessgraphed · 1 year
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rabbitcruiser · 2 months
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The Petrified Forest National Park is established in Arizona on December 9, 1962.  
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daddysakic · 27 days
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13’s not the charm
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marzipanandminutiae · 7 months
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hey, Supreme Court
you want to know why abortion isn’t in the Constitution?
because the Founding Fathers, who you seem to regard as immortal god-kings, would most likely have been okay with it. or at the very least, not thought about it much
in 18th-century England, and its colonies, abortion was widely seen as acceptable until “the quickening” (when the fetus could be felt moving in the womb). which generally happens around 16-20 weeks. based on data collected by the CDC in 2019, about 93% of abortions in the US take place well before then (source). the anti-abortion movement in the US didn’t really take off until the mid-19th century
that’s not to say there was no opposition to abortion, of course. no group is a monolith, and it was broadly quite a conservative time. denying that would be absurd. but the prevailing public opinion seems to have accepted the practice, and it was legal
not that we should be legislating based on history at all, but I think this comfortably proves that these absolute monsters are hypocrites in the bargain. and that they are somehow more conservative than a bunch of wealthy, white, landowning 18th-century men (who, if not enslavers themselves, almost certainly saw no moral conflict in befriending the same)
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Fucked up that natives were stereotyped to be savages that take peoples scalps because we're evil violent people who don't know civility.
When in reality the colonizers took our scalps for sport and sold them to generals for money. They called us redskins because of the way our blood flowed across our faces.
The fact that something that horrific was legitimately turned around on us and is something people still don't know. Or even still call us. There is no words.
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angry-antifascist · 2 months
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Maybe I’m just a jaded Marxian, but I don’t really… think he’s wrong. It’s a pretty honest reading of the Constitution and especially of the Federalist Papers.
In the Federalist Papers, Hamilton (who basically represented the interests of what would become Wall Street) and Madison (a very rich slaveholder invested in maintaining the plantation economy) wrote a LOT about how careful they were to prevent the “tyranny of the majority” and protect the “rights of the minority.” In broad terms, this sounds like it might be really noble, right?
Put it in context for a second, though. These guys were defending a Constitution which would only allow white men who held property to vote. What was the “majority” they were afraid of and the “minority” they wanted to protect?
They wanted to protect the wealth of the few from the prying hands of the many. It’s as simple as that.
Unfortunately, this guy is right about something for once.
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