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#Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change
goodblacknews · 5 months ago
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Celebrating Vocalist Nancy Wilson for #JazzAppreciationMonth (LISTEN)
by Lori Lakin Hutcherson (@lakinhutcherson) In continued celebration of #JazzAppreciationMonth, today we drop in on the underappreciated yet cherished and deeply talented song stylist Nancy Wilson, who was at one time in the 1960s the second most popular act on Capitol Records behind only the Beatles. To read about Wilson, read on. To hear about her, press…
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rabbitcruiser · 29 days ago
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Clouds (No. 760)
Atlanta, Georgia
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harlemcondolife · a year ago
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Donald P. Ryder, Architect of Black Heritage Sites, Dies at 94
Donald P. Ryder, Architect of Black Heritage Sites, Dies at 94
He and J. Max Bond Jr. partnered in a firm whose designed included public works commemorating the civil rights movement and the Schomburg Center in Harlem.
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cartermagazine · 5 months ago
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Today In History Coretta Scott King, civil rights activist and wife of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was born in Marion, AL, on this date April 27, 1927. Coretta Scott King worked side by side with Martin Luther King Jr. as he became a leader of the civil rights movement, establishing her own distinguished career as an activist. Following her husband's assassination in 1968, Coretta founded the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and later successfully lobbied for his birthday to recognized as a federal holiday. CARTER Magazine carter-mag.com #wherehistoryandhiphopmeet #historyandhiphop365 #cartermagazine #carter #staywoke #corettascottking #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory https://www.instagram.com/p/Cc2k0YHrXGe/?igshid=NGJjMDIxMWI=
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thepowersblogging · 8 months ago
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𝐁𝐑𝐄𝐀𝐊𝐈𝐍𝐆: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle,The Duke and Duchess of Sussex supplied the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta with Black-owned food trucks to Mark #MLKDAY.
𝐁𝐑𝐄𝐀𝐊𝐈𝐍𝐆: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle,The Duke and Duchess of Sussex supplied the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta with Black-owned food trucks to Mark #MLKDAY.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, marked Martin Luther King, Jr. Day by supplying food to the King Center for Nonviolent Social change in Atlanta through Black-owned businesses. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex supplied the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta with Black-owned food trucks on Monday, according to the Civil Rights icon’s daughter, Bernice…
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shewhoworshipscarlin · 7 months ago
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Coretta Scott King
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Coretta Scott King attending a ceremony dedicating an engraved marker in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on the 40th anniversary of the March on Washington.
In 1968, just days after the assassination of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., his wife, Coretta Scott King, took his place at a sanitation workers’ protest in Memphis. A few weeks later, she kicked off his planned Poor People Campaign. She had long been politically active, but her husband’s death galvanized her activism.
King earned a bachelor’s degree in Music and Education from Antioch College, and had met her future husband while studying at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. In the early years of the civil rights movement, she hosted a series of popular “Freedom Concerts,” raising thousands of dollars for the movement.
After her husband’s assassination, King campaigned tirelessly to make his birthday a national holiday, and raised millions to establish the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change. An avowed feminist, she was active in the National Organization for Women, and was an early advocate for LBGTQ rights. During the 1980s, she was a vigorous opponent of apartheid.
King understood that she would be remembered as a widow and human rights activist, but, as she once said, she hoped to be thought of a different way: “as a complex, three-dimensional, flesh-and-blood human being with a rich storehouse of experiences, much like everyone else, yet unique in my own way…much like everyone else.”
https://www.history.com/news/six-unsung-heroines-of-the-civil-rights-movement
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ucflibrary · a year ago
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The national celebration of African American History was started by Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard-trained historian and the founder of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, and first celebrated as a weeklong event in February of 1926. After a half century of overwhelming popularity, the event was expanded to a full month in 1976 by President Gerald Ford.
Here at UCF Libraries we believe that knowledge empowers everyone in our community and that recognizing past inequities is the only way to prevent their continuation. This is why our February Featured Bookshelf suggestions range from celebrating outstanding African Americans to works illuminating the effects of systemic racism in our country. We are proud to present our top staff suggested books in honor of Black History Month 2021.
Click on the link below to see the full list, descriptions, and catalog links for the Black History Month titles suggested by UCF Library employees. These books plus many, many more are also on display on the main floor of the John C. Hitt Library near the Research & Information Desk.
 A Black Women’s History of the United States by Daina Ramey Berry and Kali Nicole Gross In centering Black women's stories, two award-winning historians seek both to empower African American women and to show their allies that Black women's unique ability to make their own communities while combatting centuries of oppression is an essential component in our continued resistance to systemic racism and sexism. Berry and Gross prioritize many voices: enslaved women, freedwomen, religious leaders, artists, queer women, activists, and women who lived outside the law. The result is a starting point for exploring Black women's history and a testament to the beauty, richness, rhythm, tragedy, heartbreak, rage, and enduring love that abounds in the spirit of Black women in communities throughout the nation. Suggested by Sandy Avila, Research & Information Services
 A Bound Woman is a Dangerous Thing: the incarceration of African American women from Harriet Tubman to Sandra Bland by DaMaris B. Hill For black American women, the experience of being bound has taken many forms: from the bondage of slavery to the Reconstruction-era criminalization of women; from the brutal constraints of Jim Crow to our own era's prison industrial complex, where between 1980 and 2014, the number of incarcerated women increased by 700%. For those women who lived and died resisting the dehumanization of confinement--physical, social, intellectual--the threat of being bound was real, constant, and lethal. From Harriet Tubman to Assata Shakur, Ida B. Wells to Sandra Bland and Black Lives Matter, black women freedom fighters have braved violence, scorn, despair, and isolation in order to lodge their protests. DaMaris Hill honors their experiences with at times harrowing, at times hopeful responses to her heroes, illustrated with black-and-white photographs throughout. Suggested by Megan Haught, Student Learning & Engagement/Research & Information Services
 Be Free or Die: the amazing story of Robert Smalls' escape from slavery to Union hero by Cate Lineberry Cate Lineberry's compelling narrative illuminates Robert Smalls’ amazing journey from slave to Union hero and ultimately United States Congressman. This captivating tale of a valuable figure in American history gives fascinating insight into the country's first efforts to help newly freed slaves while also illustrating the many struggles and achievements of African Americans during the Civil War. Suggested by Dawn Tripp, Research & Information Services
 Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self by Danielle Evans Fearless, funny, and ultimately tender, Evans's stories offer a bold new perspective on the experience of being young and African-American or mixed-race in modern-day America. Suggested by Sara Duff, Acquisitions & Collections
 Black Fatigue: how racism erodes the mind, body, and spirit by Mary-Frances Winters This is the first book to define and explore Black fatigue, the intergenerational impact of systemic racism on the physical and psychological health of Black people--and explain why and how society needs to collectively do more to combat its pernicious effects. Suggested by Glen Samuels, Circulation
 Deacon King Kong by James McBride From James McBride comes a wise and witty novel about what happens to the witnesses of a shooting. In September 1969, a fumbling, cranky old church deacon known as Sportcoat shuffles into the courtyard of the Cause Houses housing project in south Brooklyn, pulls a .45 from his pocket, and in front of everybody shoots the project's drug dealer at point-blank range. McBride brings to vivid life the people affected by the shooting: the victim, the African-American and Latinx residents who witnessed it, the white neighbors, the local cops assigned to investigate, the members of the Five Ends Baptist Church where Sportcoat was deacon, the neighborhood's Italian mobsters, and Sportcoat himself. As the story deepens, it becomes clear that the lives of the characters--caught in the tumultuous swirl of 1960s New York--overlap in unexpected ways. When the truth does emerge, McBride shows us that not all secrets are meant to be hidden, that the best way to grow is to face change without fear, and that the seeds of love lie in hope and compassion. Suggested by Sara Duff, Acquisitions & Collections
 Different Strokes: Serena, Venus, and the unfinished Black tennis revolution by Cecil Harris Harris chronicles the rise of the Williams sisters, as well as other champions of color, closely examining how African Americans are collectively faring in tennis, on the court and off. Despite the success of the Williams sisters and the election of former pro player Katrina Adams as the U.S. Tennis Association’s first black president, top black players still receive racist messages via social media and sometimes in public. The reality is that while significant progress has been made in the sport, much work remains before anything resembling equality is achieved. Suggested by Megan Haught, Student Learning & Engagement/Research & Information Services
 His Truth Is Marching On: John Lewis and the power of hope by Jon Meacham John Lewis, who at age twenty-five marched in Selma and was beaten on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, is a visionary and a man of faith. Using intimate interviews with Lewis and his family and deep research into the history of the civil rights movement, Meacham writes of how the activist and leader was inspired by the Bible, his mother's unbreakable spirit, his sharecropper father's tireless ambition, and his teachers in nonviolence, Reverend James Lawson and Martin Luther King, Jr. A believer in hope above all else, Lewis learned from a young age that nonviolence was not only a tactic but a philosophy, a biblical imperative, and a transforming reality. Integral to Lewis's commitment to bettering the nation was his faith in humanity and in God, and an unshakable belief in the power of hope. Meacham calls Lewis as important to the founding of a modern and multiethnic twentieth- and twenty-first century America as Thomas Jefferson and James Madison and Samuel Adams were to the initial creation of the nation-state in the eighteenth century. Suggested by Richard Harrison, Research & Information Services
 Hitting a Straight Lick with a Crooked Stick by Zora Neale Hurston An outstanding collection of stories about love and migration, gender and class, racism and sexism that proudly reflect African American folk culture. Brought together for the first time in one volume, they include eight of Hurston’s “lost” Harlem stories, which were found in forgotten periodicals and archives. These stories challenge conceptions of Hurston as an author of rural fiction and include gems that flash with her biting, satiric humor, as well as more serious tales reflective of the cultural currents of Hurston’s world. Suggested by Sandy Avila, Research & Information Services
 Race, Sports, and Education: improving opportunities and outcomes for black male college athletes by John N. Singer Through his analysis of the system and his attention to student views and experiences, Singer crafts a valuable, nuanced account and points in the direction of reforms that would significantly improve the educational opportunities and experiences of these athletes. At a time when collegiate sports have attained unmistakable institutional value and generated unprecedented financial returns-all while largely failing the educational needs of its athletes-this book offers a clear, detailed vision of the current situation and suggestions for a more equitable way forward. Suggested by Megan Haught, Student Learning & Engagement/Research & Information Services
 Real Life by Brandon Taylor A novel of rare emotional power that excavates the social intricacies of a late-summer weekend -- and a lifetime of buried pain. Almost everything about Wallace, an introverted African-American transplant from Alabama, is at odds with the lakeside Midwestern university town where he is working toward a biochem degree. For reasons of self-preservation, Wallace has enforced a wary distance even within his own circle of friends -- some dating each other, some dating women, some feigning straightness. But a series of confrontations with colleagues, and an unexpected encounter with a young straight man, conspire to fracture his defenses, while revealing hidden currents of resentment and desire that threaten the equilibrium of their community. Suggested by Sara Duff, Acquisitions & Collections
 Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches by Audre Lorde In this charged collection of fifteen essays and speeches, Lorde takes on sexism, racism, ageism, homophobia, and class, and propounds social difference as a vehicle for action and change. Her prose is incisive, unflinching, and lyrical, reflecting struggle but ultimately offering messages of hope. Suggested by Emily Horne, Rosen Library
 The Privileged Poor: how elite colleges are failing disadvantaged students by Abraham Jack College presidents and deans of admission have opened their doors--and their coffers--to support a more diverse student body. But is it enough just to let them in? Anthony Jack reveals that the struggles of less privileged students continue long after they've arrived on campus. In their first weeks they quickly learn that admission does not mean acceptance. In this bracing and necessary book, Jack documents how university policies and cultures can exacerbate preexisting inequalities, and reveals why these policies hit some students harder than others. Jack provides concrete advice to help schools reduce these hidden disadvantages--advice we cannot afford to ignore. Suggested by Peggy Nuhn, UCF Connect Libraries
 The Sun Does Shine: how I found life and freedom on death row by Anthony Ray Hinton, with Lara Love Hardin In 1985, Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder in Alabama. Stunned, confused, and only twenty-nine years old, Hinton knew that it was a case of mistaken identity and believed that the truth would prove his innocence and ultimately set him free. But with no money and a different system of justice for a poor black man in the South, Hinton was sentenced to death by electrocution. He spent his first three years on Death Row at Holman State Prison in agonizing silence, full of despair and anger toward all those who had sent an innocent man to his death. But as Hinton realized and accepted his fate, he resolved not only to survive, but find a way to live on Death Row. For the next twenty-seven years he was a beacon, transforming not only his own spirit, but those of his fellow inmates, fifty-four of whom were executed mere feet from his cell. With the help of civil rights attorney and author Bryan Stevenson, Hinton won his release in 2015. Suggested by Lily Dubach, UCF Connect Libraries
 This is Major: notes on Diana Ross, dark girls, and being dope by Shayla Lawson Shayla Lawson is major. You don't know who she is, yet, but that's okay. She is on a mission to move black girls like herself from best supporting actress to a starring roles in the major narrative. With a unique mix of personal stories, pop culture observations, and insights into politics and history, Lawson sheds light on the many ways black femininity has influenced mainstream culture. Timely, enlightening, and wickedly sharp, Lawson shows how major black women and girls really are. Suggested by Glen Samuels, Circulation
 We Want Our Bodies Back by Jessica Care Moore Over the past two decades, Jessica Care Moore has become a cultural force as a poet, performer, publisher, activist, and critic. Reflecting her transcendent electric voice, this searing poetry collection is filled with moving, original stanzas that speak to both Black women’s creative and intellectual power, and express the pain, sadness, and anger of those who suffer constant scrutiny because of their gender and race. Fierce and passionate, she argues that Black women spend their lives building a physical and emotional shelter to protect themselves from misogyny, criminalization, hatred, stereotypes, sexual assault, objectification, patriarchy, and death threats. Suggested by Sara Duff, Acquisitions & Collections
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bobdylan-n-jonimitchell · a year ago
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Joan Baez, “Coretta Scott King (I am not your Cute Little Colored Gal)” 2020. Acrylic on panel,   34 x 22 in.
“Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, civil rights leader, and the wife of Martin Luther King Jr. An advocate for African-American equality, she was a leader for the civil rights movement in the 1960s. King was also a singer who often incorporated music into her civil rights work. Following her husband's assassination in 1968, Coretta founded the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and later successfully lobbied for his birthday to recognized as a federal holiday. “I must remind you,” King famously said, “that starving a child is violence. Neglecting school children is violence. Punishing a mother and her family is violence. Discrimination against a working man is violence. Ghetto housing is violence. Ignoring medical need is violence. Contempt for poverty is violence.”
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petervintonjr · a year ago
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Lesson 78: Meet Ella Mae Brayboy, Atlanta’s very own “Godmother of Voter Registration.” (I had actually planned to study and illustrate her story later in April, but somehow it feels VERY appropriate to discuss her life and legacy, just now, so…this lesson has been moved up. Hence my somewhat-rushed ink-and-watercolor mix.)
Born in 1919 Atlanta, Ella Mae (neé Wade) graduated in 1935 from the historic Booker T. Washington High School –a landmark for which she would later campaign to have placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Civic activism called to Ella Mae while attending that school, and she was soon immersed in what would become a lifelong commitment to civil rights and advocacy for the under-served, beginning with the SCLC and then Martin Luther King’s voter registration drive.
It was specifically the cause of voter registration that elevated Ella Mae to near-legendary status. In 1964, she became one of Georgia’s first black deputy voter registrars. In the decade that followed, she registered a record 10,000 black voters.
In her remarkable 92 years, she worked as a congressional aide to Congressman Andrew Young, was a member of the Community Council of Atlanta (1973-1976), and was director of community affairs for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (1975-1989). Among her proudest achievements were establishing use of the Atlanta Public Library for voter registration, and she also was involved in replacement of the state’s centralized balloting system with voting precincts.
Through the years, Mrs. Brayboy’s work was honored by churches, civic groups and politicians, but her focus always remained within her beloved home state of Georgia. She played a role in the establishment of a geriatric clinic at Grady Hospital. In 1988 she received the YWCA’s Women of Achievement Award, and in 1993, as chair of the Resource Development for the Fulton County Council on Aging, she fought and won the battle to allow thousands of senior citizens to ride taxis for half fare.
In 2019, the Ella Mae Wade Brayboy Park in Atlanta was dedicated in her memory.
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black-paraphernalia · a year ago
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The Mother of the Civil Rights Movement - Ella J. Baker
I have to admit that I had not heard of Ella Baker until recent. Once I started this blog to learn and share more of the true black history of my people I came across her name. She was a phenomenal women among all types. She was a QUEEN for HUMAN RIGHTS She was a champion for Civil Rights. Most feel without her contributions there would not have been a Civil Right Movement.
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Ella Josephine Baker (December 13, 1903 – December 13, 1986) was an African-American civil rights and human rights activist. She was a largely behind-the-scenes organizer whose career spanned more than five decades.
In New York City and the South, she worked alongside some of the most noted civil rights leaders of the 20th century, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Thurgood Marshall, A. Philip Randolph, and Martin Luther King Jr. 
She also mentored many emerging activists, such as Diane Nash, Stokely Carmichael, Rosa Parks, and Bob Moses, whom she first mentored as leaders in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).
Baker criticized professionalized, charismatic leadership; she promoted grassroots organizing, radical democracy, and the ability of the oppressed to understand their worlds and advocate for themselves. 
She realized this vision most fully in the 1960s as the primary advisor and strategist of the SNCC. Baker has been called "one of the most important American leaders of the twentieth century and perhaps the most influential woman in the civil rights movement." She is known for her critiques not only of racism within American culture, but also of sexism within the civil rights movement - Excerpt from Wikipida 
Black Paraphernalia Disclaimer - all images from Google images
ARTICIAL BY KINGINSTITUTE STANFORD EDUCATION
ELLA J. BAKER  Rejecting Martin Luther King’s charismatic leadership, Ella Baker advised student activists organizing the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to promote “group-centered leaders” rather than the “leader-centered” style she associated with King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) (Baker, 19 June 1968). It was this grassroots leadership that Baker credited for the success and longevity of the movement: “You see, I think that, to be very honest, the movement made Martin rather than Martin making the movement. This is not a discredit to him. This is, to me, as it should be” (Baker, 19 June 1968).
Born in Norfolk, Virginia, on 13 December 1903, Baker was raised on the same land her grandparents had worked as slaves. Baker’s childhood was marked early on by the activist spirit of her mother, a member of the local missionary association, who called on women to act as agents of social change in their communities.
After graduating from Shaw University in 1927, Baker moved to New York, where she served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League. In 1938 Baker joined the staff of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) as an assistant field secretary and later as director of branches. Unable to redirect the organization’s focus toward grassroots organizing, Baker resigned from her position in 1946. She joined the NAACP again in 1952 as president of the New York City branch. In 1956 Baker, along with Stanley Levison and Bayard Rustin, co-founded In Friendship, an organization founded to provide aid to local movements in the South.
In January 1958 Baker moved to Atlanta to organize SCLC’s Crusade for Citizenship, a campaign to help enforce voting rights for black citizens. She ran SCLC’s Atlanta headquarters, and after Executive Director John Tilley resigned in April 1959 she filled in until a permanent director was hired the following year.
In addition to her criticism of SCLC’s organizing philosophy, Baker also experienced conflicts with her male colleagues. Andrew Young described Baker as a “determined woman” and went on to say: “The Baptist church had no tradition of women in independent leadership roles, and the result was dissatisfaction all around” (Young, 137).
Following the February 1960 sit-ins in Greensboro, North Carolina, Baker and King called a conference of student activists at Shaw University. The result of this April meeting was a student-led organization known as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Already serving in an advisory capacity to the growing student movement, Baker left SCLC in August 1960.
In addition to continuing her involvement as an advisor to SNCC, Baker served as a consultant to the Southern Conference Education Fund throughout the mid-1960s and helped organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. She returned to New York in the late 1960s and remained active in the civil rights struggle until her death in 1986.
Rejecting Martin Luther King’s charismatic leadership, Ella Baker advised student activists organizing the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to promote “group-centered leaders” rather than the “leader-centered” style she associated with King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) (Baker, 19 June 1968). It was this grassroots leadership that Baker credited for the success and longevity of the movement: “You see, I think that, to be very honest, the movement made Martin rather than Martin making the movement. This is not a discredit to him. This is, to me, as it should be” (Baker, 19 June 1968).
Born in Norfolk, Virginia, on 13 December 1903, Baker was raised on the same land her grandparents had worked as slaves. Baker’s childhood was marked early on by the activist spirit of her mother, a member of the local missionary association, who called on women to act as agents of social change in their communities.
After graduating from Shaw University in 1927, Baker moved to New York, where she served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League. In 1938 Baker joined the staff of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) as an assistant field secretary and later as director of branches. Unable to redirect the organization’s focus toward grassroots organizing, Baker resigned from her position in 1946. She joined the NAACP again in 1952 as president of the New York City branch. In 1956 Baker, along with Stanley Levison and Bayard Rustin, co-founded In Friendship, an organization founded to provide aid to local movements in the South.
In January 1958 Baker moved to Atlanta to organize SCLC’s Crusade for Citizenship, a campaign to help enforce voting rights for black citizens. She ran SCLC’s Atlanta headquarters, and after Executive Director John Tilley resigned in April 1959 she filled in until a permanent director was hired the following year.
In addition to her criticism of SCLC’s organizing philosophy, Baker also experienced conflicts with her male colleagues. Andrew Young described Baker as a “determined woman” and went on to say: “The Baptist church had no tradition of women in independent leadership roles, and the result was dissatisfaction all around” (Young, 137).
Following the February 1960 sit-ins in Greensboro, North Carolina, Baker and King called a conference of student activists at Shaw University. The result of this April meeting was a student-led organization known as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Already serving in an advisory capacity to the growing student movement, Baker left SCLC in August 1960.
In addition to continuing her involvement as an advisor to SNCC, Baker served as a consultant to the Southern Conference Education Fund throughout the mid-1960s and helped organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. She returned to New York in the late 1960s and remained active in the civil rights struggle until her death in 1986.
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dippedanddripped · a year ago
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With the goal of synchronizing efforts to address systemic racism through structural change-making, Christian Louboutin has teamed up with friends Idris and Sabrina Elba to create the “Walk a Mile in My Shoes” capsule collection.
The collection features men’s and women’s styles inscribed with the quote “Walk a Mile in My Shoes,” a phrase that seeks to express solidarity, empathy, and action.
One hundred percent of proceeds from the collection will directly benefit five grassroots organizations across three continents that are committed to creating self-sustainable equity in communities of color. Humanitarian relief charity Be Rose supports vulnerable people in need of emergency assistance and empowers widows to care for their families through agribusiness. Close to Idris’s heart and rooted in his Sierra Leonean heritage, Purposeful is a grassroots organization that provides mentorship for girls. Idris’s patronage of The Immediate Theatre in East London reinforces the message that access to the arts should be available to all. Sabrina’s roots are reflected in The Somali Hope Foundation’s continued efforts to provide access to education for underprivileged children. Founded by Harry Belafonte, Gathering for Justice’s mission to end child incarceration, centering nonviolence as a foundation for civic and social justice engagement, makes it an organization that is close to Christian’s heart.
The global outcry that occurred in May 2020 sparked a worldwide conversation about privilege, systematic injustice, and racism. Idris and Sabrina felt compelled to add their voices, and as a visible Black couple, they spoke candidly about global inequality and shared their first-hand experiences of discrimination. Using their social media platforms as a vehicle to call for change, the couple engaged in an Instagram live discussion with one of the co-founders of the Black Lives Matter movement, Opal Tometi. They were unaware that Christian was listening in at the time and after the talk, he expressed to them how powerful, moving, and hopeful he had found their discussion – “I’m proud of you, and I’m here for you” he told them.
Taking the thought-provoking conversation offline, the three friends were certain that they wanted to give back in a way that would be truly impactful. To raise awareness directly benefitting the lives of the individuals and communities whose voices matter yet are often unheard, they looked to historic leaders Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela. Their dedication to the fight for justice, equality, and freedom offered design inspiration.
This inspiration was channeled into co-creating an uplifting two-chapter collection. The collection features styles showcasing Strelitzia reginae, or “Mandela’s Gold,” a beautiful plant that has come to symbolize empathy, hope, and freedom.
“Walk a Mile in My Shoes” appears in a script motif, evocative in Louboutin red. It originates from a visit Idris paid to the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial in Los Angeles. The trio are not suggesting that anyone walks a mile in their shoes, but instead to consider the motto as a call to action. A call to support the victims of police brutality and racial injustice in the United States, small farmers and their children in Somalia, disconnected underserved youth in England, and orphaned children and young girls in Sierra Leone.
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rabbitcruiser · a month ago
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Clouds (No. 759)
Atlanta, Georgia
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didanawisgi · a year ago
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“History is highlighted by turning points, moments of brilliance in the journey of humanity, episodes that changed civilization. These junctures often took place at times of great tragedy, during wars, famines, plagues, and revolution. Because at precisely those times, when the worst of human depravity became evident, we also witnessed the emergence of some of our greatest humanitarians, those who withstood opposition with grace and wisdom.
As steel is forged in a blast furnace, the best in humanity can only arise out of its cruelest chapters. Oskar Schindler, a Nazi, gave away all his wealth to safeguard vulnerable Jewish people out of harm’s way, away from the gas chambers. Oskar devoted his life at significant personal risk to saving others less fortunate; this is perhaps the fundamental principle of humanity.
Mohandas Gandhi raised a family as a successful lawyer in South Africa yet chose to return to India to stop genocide. He traded a life of comfort for one of fasting, nonviolent protests, and personal risk. An assassin's bullet took his life in 1948, but not before he had spent 78 years on the planet and changed it forever. He is revered by many as the Father of India. His nonviolent protests to further social change inspired others to do the same, like Martin Luther King Jr, Robert Kennedy, and Nelson Mandela.
Nelson Mandela paid his price of tribulation with 27 years in a prison cell, one without a bed or plumbing. He spent his days breaking rocks and his free time writing. His manuscripts were scrutinized, restricted, censored, or destroyed. Nonetheless, he smuggled out a 500-page autobiography in 1976 and led a protest movement for prison rights.
This expanded into the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. Out of Mandela's great suffering arose the principle of racial equality for South Africa, where he would ultimately be elected its first president. He remains affectionately known today as Madiba and is widely regarded as the Father of the Nation. He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 for his nonviolent protests that proved victorious in ending the apartheid regime.
Dr. Tess Lawrie is a world-class researcher and consultant to the World Health Organization. Her biggest clients happen to be those who are involved in the suppression of repurposed drugs. She has decided to speak out in protest against the current medical establishment at considerable personal risk.
She co-founded the BIRD panel, an international group of experts dedicated to the transparent and accurate scientific research of Ivermectin. On April 24, 2021, she convened the International Ivermectin for COVID Conference, the first such symposium in the world held to focus on Ivermectin to prevent and treat COVID-19.
During the conference, she delivered a monumental closing address, one that will be recorded in the annals of medical history.
"They who design the trials and control the data also control the outcome. So, this system of industry-led trials needs to be put to an end. Data from ongoing and future trials of novel COVID treatments must be independently controlled and analyzed. Anything less than total transparency cannot be trusted."
Dr. Lawrie called for reform of the method used to analyze scientific evidence.
She reported, "The story of Ivermectin has highlighted that we are at a remarkable juncture in medical history. The tools that we use to heal and our connection with our patients are being systematically undermined by relentless disinformation stemming from corporate greed. The story of Ivermectin shows that we as a public have misplaced our trust in the authorities and have underestimated the extent to which money and power corrupts.
Had Ivermectin being employed in 2020 when medical colleagues around the world first alerted the authorities to its efficacy, millions of lives could have been saved, and the pandemic with all its associated suffering and loss brought to a rapid and timely end."
Dr. Lawrie called out the corruption of modern medicine by Big Pharma and other interests.
She went on, "Since then, hundreds of millions of people have been involved in the largest medical experiment in human history. Mass vaccination was an unproven novel therapy. Hundreds of billions will be made by Big Pharma and paid for by the public. With politicians and other nonmedical individuals dictating to us what we are allowed to prescribe to the ill, we as doctors, have been put in a position such that our ability to uphold the Hippocratic oath is under attack.
At this fateful juncture, we must therefore choose, will we continue to be held ransom by corrupt organizations, health authorities, Big Pharma, and billionaire sociopaths, or will we do our moral and professional duty to do no harm and always do the best for those in our care? The latter includes urgently reaching out to colleagues around the world to discuss which of our tried and tested safe older medicines can be used against COVID."
Finally, Dr. Lawrie suggested that physicians form a new World Health Organization that represents the interests of the people, not corporations and billionaires, a people-centered organization.
"Never before has our role as doctors been so important because never before have we become complicit in causing so much harm."
Dr. Albert Schweitzer would be proud. A Nobel laureate from 1952, Dr. Schweitzer won the Nobel Prize not for his work as a renowned medical missionary physician, but "for his altruism, reverence for life, and tireless humanitarian work which has helped make the idea of brotherhood between men and nations a living one."
While Mandela and King fought for equality in human rights, Dr. Schweitzer is most remembered for his principle of the ethic of "reverence for life."  
Schweitzer wrote, "Ethics is nothing other than reverence for life. Reverence for life affords me my fundamental principle of morality, namely, that good consists of maintaining, assisting, and enhancing life, and to destroy, harm or hinder life is evil."
Dr. Tess Lawrie knows that scientifically, Ivermectin saves lives. But moreover, she knows beyond any doubt that corruption has prevented Ivermectin from saving millions, caused untold suffering and horror, and a human economic toll of unimaginable proportions.
Out of this Pandemic have risen the true healers, those physicians who will be forever revered for risking their careers to save lives. When they could have remained silent and allowed the pandemic to take its course without rocking the boat, they chose to act.
Dr. George Fareed, Dr. Harvey Risch, and Dr. Peter McCullough traveled to the US Capitol and addressed the US Senate on November 19, 2020 and pleaded for the FDA and NIH to institute early outpatient treatment. They warned of the surge in deaths that would come. No answer. However, now during the current deadly second surge in India, on April 22, the Indian Council of Medical Research has just adopted Ivermectin and Budesonide for early outpatient therapy.
So why couldn’t the US have done the same and heed the advice of Fareed and others, and with the stroke of a pen in November accord Ivermectin Emergency Use Authorization? Fully 300,000 lives could have been saved.
These physicians are the pandemic humanitarians; to Dr. George Fareed, who stood up to Dr. Anthony Fauci; to Dr. Brian Tyson, who borrowed $250,000  in a personal loan to save the Imperial Valley; and to Dr. Harvey Risch, who risked his professorship at Yale to speak out; to Dr. Peter McCullough of Texas, who authored the first study on early outpatient treatment; to Dr. Pierre Kory, who put his career on the line, to Dr. Tess Lawrie, physician, humanitarian, and reformer, who is leading the path to victory over the pandemic, a beacon of hope for human rights and the conscience of medicine.”
Signed, 
Justus R. Hope, MD
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rockislandadultreads · a year ago
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Black History Month: Notable Black Women
My Life, My Love, My Legacy by Coretta Scott King
The life story of Coretta Scott King—wife of Martin Luther King Jr., founder of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and singular twentieth-century American civil rights activist—as told fully for the first time Born in 1927 to daringly enterprising black parents in the Deep South, Coretta Scott had always felt called to a special purpose. One of the first black scholarship students recruited to Antioch College, a committed pacifist, and a civil rights activist, she was an avowed feminist—a graduate student determined to pursue her own career—when she met Martin Luther King Jr., a Baptist minister insistent that his wife stay home with the children. But in love and devoted to shared Christian beliefs and racial justice goals, she married King, and events promptly thrust her into a maelstrom of history throughout which she was a strategic partner, a standard bearer, a marcher, a negotiator, and a crucial fundraiser in support of world-changing achievements. As a widow and single mother of four, while butting heads with the all-male African American leadership of the times, she championed gay rights and AIDS awareness, founded the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, lobbied for fifteen years to help pass a bill establishing the US national holiday in honor of her slain husband, and was a powerful international presence, serving as a UN ambassador and playing a key role in Nelson Mandela's election. Coretta’s is a love story, a family saga, and the memoir of an independent-minded black woman in twentieth-century America, a brave leader who stood committed, proud, forgiving, nonviolent, and hopeful in the face of terrorism and violent hatred every single day of her life.
The Truths We Hold: An American Journey by Kamala Harris
From one of America's most inspiring political leaders, a book about the core truths that unite us, and the long struggle to discern what those truths are and how best to act upon them, in her own life and across the life of our country. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris's commitment to speaking truth is informed by her upbringing. The daughter of immigrants, she was raised in an Oakland, California community that cared deeply about social justice; her parents--an esteemed economist from Jamaica and an admired cancer researcher from India--met as activists in the civil rights movement when they were graduate students at Berkeley. Growing up, Harris herself never hid her passion for justice, and when she became a prosecutor out of law school, a deputy district attorney, she quickly established herself as one of the most innovative change agents in American law enforcement. She progressed rapidly to become the elected District Attorney for San Francisco, and then the chief law enforcement officer of the state of California as a whole. Known for bringing a voice to the voiceless, she took on the big banks during the foreclosure crisis, winning a historic settlement for California's working families. Her hallmarks were applying a holistic, data-driven approach to many of California's thorniest issues, always eschewing stale "tough on crime" rhetoric as presenting a series of false choices. Neither "tough" nor "soft" but smart on crime became her mantra. Being smart means learning the truths that can make us better as a community, and supporting those truths with all our might. That has been the pole star that guided Harris to a transformational career as the top law enforcement official in California, and it is guiding her now as a transformational United States Senator, grappling with an array of complex issues that affect her state, our country, and the world, from health care and the new economy to immigration, national security, the opioid crisis, and accelerating inequality. By reckoning with the big challenges we face together, drawing on the hard-won wisdom and insight from her own career and the work of those who have most inspired her, Kamala Harris offers in The Truths We Hold a master class in problem-solving, in crisis management, and leadership in challenging times. Through the arc of her own life, on into the great work of our day, she communicates a vision of shared struggle, shared purpose, and shared values. In a book rich in many home truths, not least is that a relatively small number of people work very hard to convince a great many of us that we have less in common than we actually do, but it falls to us to look past them and get on with the good work of living our common truth. When we do, our shared effort will continue to sustain us and this great nation, now and in the years to come.
Becoming by Michelle Obama
In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare. In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.
More Myself: A Journey by Alicia Keys
An intimate, revealing look at one artist’s journey from self-censorship to full expression. As one of the most celebrated musicians of our time, Alicia Keys has enraptured the nation with her heartfelt lyrics, extraordinary vocal range, and soul-stirring piano compositions. Yet away from the spotlight, Alicia has grappled with private heartache―over the challenging and complex relationship with her father, the people-pleasing nature that characterized her early career, the loss of privacy surrounding her romantic relationships, and the oppressive expectations of female perfection. Since her rise to fame, Alicia’s public persona has belied a deep personal truth: she has spent years not fully recognizing or honoring her own worth. After withholding parts of herself for so long, she is at last exploring the questions that live at the heart of her story: Who am I, really? And once I discover that truth, how can I become brave enough to embrace it? More Myself is part autobiography, part narrative documentary. Alicia’s journey is revealed not only through her own candid recounting, but also through vivid recollections from those who have walked alongside her. The result is a 360-degree perspective on Alicia’s path―from her girlhood in Hell’s Kitchen and Harlem, to the process of self-discovery she’s still navigating. In More Myself, Alicia shares her quest for truth―about herself, her past, and her shift from sacrificing her spirit to celebrating her worth. With the raw honesty that epitomizes Alicia’s artistry, More Myself is at once a riveting account and a clarion call to readers: to define themselves in a world that rarely encourages a true and unique identity.
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girlactionfigure · a year ago
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For Black History Month
When she was laid to rest on February 7, 2006, four U.S. Presidents (George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, Jimmy Carter), would attend her funeral, as well as a future president (then-senator Barack Obama). More than 14,000 people would be there to remember her that day.
She would be referred to as the "First Lady of the Civil Rights Movement."
Her name was Coretta Scott King (April 27, 1927 – January 30, 2006), and she would be remembered for her courage, for her strength, and for her grace.
Author Maya Angelou would say that the day of her death was a "bleak morning for me and for many people and yet it's a great morning because we have a chance to look at her and see what she did and who she was. It's bleak because I can't — many of us can't hear her sweet voice — but it's great because she did live, and she was ours. I mean African-Americans and white Americans and Asians, Spanish-speaking — she belonged to us and that's a great thing."
What Coretta Scott King was was not only the wife and partner of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., but also a leader in her own right, leading the struggles after her husband's death for equal right, not only for African-Americans, but also for women's and LGBT rights.
She said after her husband's death that "I'm more determined than ever that my husband's dream will become a reality."
What she did was that she founded the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, focusing on the issues that she said breed violence such as hunger, unemployment, voting rights and racism.
A former member of the National Board of Directors of NOW, she campaigned for the Equal Rights Amendment and called for women to "unite and form a solid block of women power to fight the three great evils of racism, poverty and war," encouraging women to increase their voting turnout by ten percent to see an end to all of the budget cuts in programs benefiting women and children.
She would became an advocate for world peace and she would speak up for economic justice.
She fought for the poor, saying, "I must remind you that starving a child is violence. Neglecting school children is violence. Punishing a mother and her family is violence. Discrimination against a working man is violence. Ghetto housing is violence. Ignoring medical need is violence. Contempt for poverty is violence.”
When a group of black pastors tried to block gay and lesbian couples from marrying, Coretta Scott King would stand up and say, "I still hear people say that I should not be talking about the rights of lesbian and gay people. ... But I hasten to remind them that Martin Luther King Jr. said, 'Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.' I appeal to everyone who believes in Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream, to make room at the table of brotherhood and sisterhood for lesbian and gay people."
When Congress refused to consider a national holiday for her husband, she would never give up, calling it a "peoples’ holiday," celebrating the spirit of brother and sisterhood, whether you are African-American, Hispanic or Native American, whether you are Caucasian or Asian-American, expressing Dr. King's great dream for America.
And, when the Senate considered the nomination of Jeff Sessions, she would write a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee, asking her voice to be heard and questioning Session's ability to be fair when he had a record of intimidating elderly, black voters.
She would also say, "Freedom and justice cannot be parceled out in pieces to suit political convenience. I don't believe you can stand for freedom for one group of people and deny it to others.”
She would say, "Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater more than it injures the hated.”
Despite the assassination of her husband, despite all her battles and struggles, like her husband, Coretta Scott King saw hope, telling her listeners to never give up, saying, "Many despair at all the evil and unrest and disorder in the world today, but I see a new social order and I see the dawn of a new day."
The Jon S. Randal Peace Page
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consult2architect · 2 months ago
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"It Starts With Me!" Book Signing at Galleria Dallas Aug. 20
“It Starts With Me!” Book Signing at Galleria Dallas Aug. 20
Photo courtesy Galleria Dallas Facebook Twitter Pinterest “It Starts With Me!,” an impactful children’s book written by Dr. Bernice A. King and Dr. Kimberly P. Johnson, will be in the spotlight at the Galleria Dallas Aug. 20. Dr. King is CEO of The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (The King Center). As the daughter of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Mrs.…
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shatar-aethelwynn · 2 months ago
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Could I interest anyone in a three-part series of talks presented by The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change on The Triple Evils?
Part 1: Militarism. Host: Dr. Vonnetta L. West. Speakers: Dr. Bernice A. King, Shane Claiborne, Dr. Cornel West. Given in April, 2022.
Part 2: Racism. Host: Dr. Vonnetta L. West. Speakers: Tim Wise, Charles Blow, Dr. Robi DiAngelo. Given in May, 2022.
Part 3: Poverty. Host: Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis. Speakers: Michael Tubbs, Hope Wollensack, Ashley Bell. Given in May, 2022.
The King Center website
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