Tumpik
#textiles
funzos · 2 days
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Teeny tiny tufted houses 🏘️
[ID: Nine small tufted houses, all of them are different shapes, sizes and colors. End ID]
insta ♡ shop ♡ prints & stickers
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threadtalk · 2 days
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High res photo alert! I just want to hug whoever takes these photos at the Museum of New Zealand, because OMG. The detail!
I think I'm in my red/pink/blush gown era, because this is another one that I just had to share.
This robe à l'anglaise retroussée dates from the 1770s-1780s, and is English. It's made of silk damask, one of my favorites, in this gorgeous burgundy and cream silk floral pattern. Unlike the French sack back gowns of this time, this one laces up tight on the other side, hence it's à l'anglaise.
Retroussée refers to the skirt length, which would have been pulled up.
This silhouette made a big comeback in the 1840s and the 1880s. And you can see why! It's pretty classic.
Robe à l'anglaise retroussée, 1770-1780, England, maker unknown. Gift of Mrs B Vye, 1951. CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. Te Papa (PC000071)
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s0larize · 24 hours
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banji-effect · 3 days
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Lenore Tawney, Little River, 1968 and Dark River, 1962
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umabloomer · 3 months
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Crochet bread cloth from the French-Canadian community in Manitoba, Manitoba Crafts Museum and Library
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saja-star · 4 months
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One of my favorite things about learning about traditional textiles is the little ghosts they left in the language. Of course the ghosts are there, now that I know to look for them. Once upon a time, half the population spent a majority of their day making textiles. Spinning, at the very least, has been a part of humanity since the Neanderthals. That kind of knowledge doesn't just disappear.
A heckle was a device with sharp metal spikes, and people drag flax through the spikes to separate out the fibers from the chaff. When you say someone heckled a performer, you think you are being literal but you're speaking in an ancient metaphor.
When my grandpa says "spinning yarns" to mean telling stories, he knows that one's not quite literal, but its vividness is lost to him. There is no image in his mind of rhythm, muscle memory, and the subtle twist that aligns clouds of fibers into a single, strong cord.
When a fanfic writer describes someone carding their fingers through someone's hair, that's the most discordant in my mind. Carding is rough, and quick, and sometimes messy (my wool is full of debris, even after lots of washing). The teeth of my cards are densely packed and scratchy. But maybe that's my error, not the writer's. Before cards were invented, wool was combed with wide-toothed combs, and sometimes, in point of fact, with fingers. The verb "to card" (from Middle English) may actually be older than the tools I use, archaic as they are. And I say may, because I can't find a definitive history. People forget, even when the language remembers.
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auntpelvis · 7 months
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embroidery of some electric pylons on an old doiley
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prokopetz · 1 month
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I’ve seen so many threads debating the merits of rayon and whether it’s a plastic or a “natural fibre” going around, and y’all, the problem with rayon is not whether or not it satisfies some technical definition of synthetic fibre.
The problem is that the most common method of manufacturing rayon is so ridiculously toxic that it’s literally killing the people who work in the facilities where it’s produced, and is illegal to carry out in much of the world as a result – but instead of using better (more expensive) methods, everybody just imports the stuff from places where killing your workers for the sake of a buck isn’t effectively regulated.
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zegalba · 2 months
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Issey Miyake: Utilized Textiles (1984-1987) Designed By: Makiko Minagawa
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maldecorum · 13 days
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a quilt about the cycle of receiving inspiration, support, and energy from your community and using it to create something which you in turn share with the same community and pass on to others 💫
below the garden are pockets containing seed packets to represent sowing seeds for future generations 🌱
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threadtalk · 2 days
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Some colors just make my heart happy. This gown is peak Gothic, dating from 1840-1850, potentially of German origin. If you like layer cake gowns with staying power, this is ideal.
Miles of rose pink taffeta silk, Chinese style embroidery, and those mirrored V shapes at the bodice top and bottom just make this perfect for a princess (or a princess at heart). The embroidery at the bottom of the bodice just kills me it's so beautiful and delicate. Monochrome can be so beautiful!
Image Credit: © Historic Deerfield, Inc.
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meiosys · 4 months
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empty, together
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lemainestudio · 4 months
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hi i’m the gore designer this is flesh fashion i make it & this is my life
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umabloomer · 2 months
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Kewpie quilt, 1916
https://www.internationalquiltmuseum.org/quilt/20210210012
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itscolossal · 7 months
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Patchwork Coats with Frayed Fur Add Shaggy Texture to Barbara Franc’s Dog Sculptures
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spectrologie · 3 months
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Millie Amber
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