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southern-gothic-soul · a day ago
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janasojka · 19 days ago
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Night sea.
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candela888 · 3 months ago
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Regional map of the USA
Hello, I made this regional map of the USA, after doing research and getting a lot of suggestions from people from all across the country. Tell me what you think, and hope you enjoy!
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matthewgrantanson · 3 months ago
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Winter in Louisiana From Above, New Orleans -- December 20th, 2021
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without-ado · 6 months ago
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Topography Maps of Asian Regions
ll cr. to the rightful owner l via Epic Map AddictMap akhivae
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afloweroutofstone · 2 months ago
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Memphis, Tennessee has voted out its Republican District Attorney, who refused to bring charges against murderous police officers. With more than 55% of the vote, the southern city has instead elected a reform DA who ran on alternatives to incarceration for non-violent crimes, bail reform, independent prosecutors for police shootings, an overhaul of the juvenile justice system, and opposition to harsh sentencing policies.
The city limits population of Memphis is larger than San Francisco, where the recall of a reform DA by voters recently made national news as a supposed sign of voters wanting more tough-on-crime policies.
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kurdishrecognition · 5 months ago
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streets of kurdistan, 2000 by david butow
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lausterdomyamong · 5 months ago
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Climate change or u
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jievan · a year ago
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【四方元素】 The Four Elements 南方-火元素 South - Fire 東方-土元素 East - Earth 北方-水元素 North - Water 西方-風元素 West - Air
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confusion-n-delay · 6 months ago
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southern-gothic-soul · a month ago
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janasojka · 2 months ago
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Moon & Sea, blue night.
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sibylvanereimagined · 3 months ago
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X 2022 dir. Ti West
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matthewgrantanson · 3 months ago
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Pleasantries, New Orleans -- December 18th, 2021
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bharatpics · 10 months ago
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Nellaiappar Temple, A 7th Century Wonder!
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afloweroutofstone · 2 months ago
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While almost every state in the country, both red and blue, levies fines and fees that fall disproportionately on the bottom rung of the income ladder, the situation in Alabama is far more dramatic, thanks to the peculiarities of its Constitution. Over a century ago, wealthy landowners and businessmen rewrote the Constitution to cap taxes permanently. As a result, today, Alabama has one of the cruelest tax systems in the country.
Taxes on most property, for example, are exceptionally low. In 2019, property taxes accounted for just 7 percent of state and local revenue, the lowest among the states. (Even Mississippi, which also has low property taxes, got roughly 12 percent from property taxes. New Jersey, by contrast, got 29 percent.) Strapped for cash, all levels of government look for money anywhere they can get it. And often, that means creating revenue from fines and fees. A 2016 study showed that the median assessment for a felony in Alabama doubled between 1995 and 2005, to $2,000.
In most of the country, if residents of a school district or county want to raise taxes to pay for a new library or electrical systems, they are free to impose a new tax on themselves. Not so in Alabama. Its cities and counties do not have home rule, so they have to go through the State Legislature, which often has to initiate a constitutional amendment allowing them to pass a law. It’s an astonishingly backward system, and it’s why Alabama has the longest Constitution on the planet, with an absurd 977 amendments. (The U.S. Constitution has only 27, even though it has been around almost twice as long.) “Alabama wants totalitarianism,” said Leah Nelson of Alabama Appleseed Center for Law and Justice, “but they just don’t want to pay for it.”...
To understand how Alabama came to be so underdeveloped, you need only look to the Black Belt, a large region originally named for its rich black dirt that sweeps across the lower midsection of the state. The earth is full of crushed limestone left behind by the sea that once covered the land. Montgomery, Alabama’s capital, is in the heart of the region. It’s an agriculturally rich area that was once blanketed by cotton plantations worked by enslaved people. Much of the area is still rural and agricultural, but the product isn’t cotton; it is, among other things, timber. Drive just a few minutes outside Montgomery and you’re flanked by forest. Rows of loblolly pine stand sentinel along the roads, waiting to be turned into America’s paper. Much of the land is owned by multinational corporations, international investors, hedge funds, some families that live outside the Black Belt and some whose ancestors cultivated the land before the Civil War.
Many of those families’ agricultural interests were top of mind when state lawmakers rewrote Alabama’s Constitution. In 1874, less than a decade into Reconstruction, the Democratic Party, representing the landowning, formerly slave-owning class, took over the state government in a rigged election and quickly passed a new Constitution that mandated taxes on property would remain permanently low.
In the next couple of decades, as cotton prices crashed, poor sharecroppers, both white and Black, banded together in a populist movement to unseat the elites who controlled the state. In response, in another set of contested elections, the elites called another constitutional convention to further consolidate their power over the state. “What is it that we want to do?” the convention president, John B. Knox, asked. “Establish white supremacy in this state.” But this time, he said, they wanted to “establish it by law — not by force or fraud.”
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sanzufobic · 11 months ago
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HELP 😭😭
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