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#roman mythology
alioszas · a year ago
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“I’ve got a bullet with your name on it” aka Cupid in the Wild West
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isa-writes · 9 months ago
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Listen, this is a very specific topic to be iffy about, but for your knowledge, the Roman gods are not the Greek gods.
The Romans were big on syncretism (the combination of different forms of belief or intellectual thought) and the adoption of foreign gods. The Greek deities were known since very early periods via the Etruscan culture, which was heavily influenced by Greece since the middle of the 8th century BC because of trade routes as well as the Greek cultural potential and would come to be completely engulfed around the third century BC with the Roman-Etruscan wars, but just like you’d see the Romans claiming the Germanic tribes worshipped their own gods under different names (the Germania by Roman historian Tacitus, written around 98 AD), the same happened here, and the fusion wasn’t 100% accurate.
While in the case of Zeus and Jupiter, for example, it worked well, Venus is far more motherly and political than Aphrodite (as Mars is the Father of Rome via the myth of Romulus and Remus, Venus is Venus Genetrix, Venus the Mother, and the only time you’ll see Aphrodite being motherly is in... the Aeneid, a distinctively Roman piece), Mars is an agricultural god as well as the god of war and has way more political connotations than Ares (he was a member of the archaic Capitoline Triad), Mercury is far more linked with commerce than the more pastoral Hermes, and the list goes on. Apollo was imported directly and very early (a temple for him, the Temple of Apollo Sosianus, was erected in the city of Rome as early as 431 BC), thus keeping the name but undergoing a very distinct Romanization of his attributes and worship. Janus, Quirinus and Terminus were very important Roman gods which had no Greek equivalent.
Isis, for example, was worshipped as herself, equated with a number of deities in both the Greek and the Roman worlds and some of her methods of worship and symbolism were associated with the Virgin Mary. It’s a far more complicated scenario, babes, especially when you consider Alexander’s conquests and the expansion of Hellenistic culture as well as its contact with many other cultures.
Syncretism is way more complicated than “the Romans just stole the Greek gods and gave them different names, the uncreative fucks”. The traditional date for Rome’s foundation is 753 BC and the Western Roman Empire would last until 436 AD. That’s over a thousand years of conquest, trade and growing and shrinking territories, and none of these factors are likely to leave a religion unaltered.
Besides, the practice of religious syncretism is way older and more common than you’d expect. The Akkadians did it to Summerian deities a few thousand years before this especially after the conquest of Sargon of Akkad in 2340 BC ("Mesopotamia: the Sumerians". Washington State University). The Greeks were doing much the same with the Roman pantheon itself (Dionysus of Halicarnassus and Plutarch use Greek names for Roman cult), with the Egyptian pantheon and with the Scythian pantheon (Herodotus in both cases, though the associations would outlive him, such as the case of Zeus/Amon).
So, no the Roman gods aren’t the plagiarized versions of the Greek gods, and I could defend this in front of a jury.
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eirene · 4 months ago
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Diana Leaving Her Bath
Guillaume Dubufe
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evermore-fashion · 9 months ago
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Luna (meaning ‘moon’) was the goddess of the moon and often presented as the female complement to Sol (god of the sun) in Roman mythology. She was also sometimes represented as an aspect of the Roman triple goddess (diva triformis), along with Proserpina (goddess of fertility) and Hecate (the greek goddess of magic). Luna was not always a distinct goddess, but sometimes rather an epithet that specialised a goddess, since both Diana (goddess of the hunt) and Juno (queen of the gods) were also identified as moon goddesses. Her Greek counterpart was the moon goddess Selene and in Roman art and literature, myths of Selene were adapted under the name of Luna. (Georges Hobeika Fall 2018 Haute Couture Collection)
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visit-ba-sing-se · 6 months ago
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*please insert a funny caption and enjoy these academia memes ft. Echo and Narcissus*
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aphrodites-divine-nectar · a month ago
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My vibes (I’m Persephone)
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anonymous-ivplay · a month ago
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I literally cannot think of a better name for the Roman god of penises
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evermore-grimoire · 8 days ago
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The Evermore Grimoire: Mythology
Cupid (Cupīdō, meaning ‘passionate desire’) is the god of erotic love, desire, attraction and affection in Roman mythology. He was either depicted as a handsome and a slender winged pre-teen youth or as a chubby winged baby. Just like his Greek counterpart Eros, his bow and arrow, is the source of his powers: a person or even a deity who was shot by Cupid's arrow would be filled with an uncontrollable desire and passion for the first person they saw. In contemporary popular culture, Cupid is shown drawing his bow to inspire romantic love, often as an icon of Valentine's Day.
artwork by Cynthia Lorenzon
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craigsonoble · a year ago
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the-evil-clergyman · 2 months ago
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Birth of Venus by Fritz Zuber-Buhler (1877)
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paganpillar · 3 months ago
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Unpopular Opinion: The Gods would never let a trickster spirit claim to be them. Most religious people are not scared of malicious entities masquerading as their God(s). Have more faith that your Gods will take care of you.
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artthatgivesmefeelings · 3 months ago
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Jules Joseph Lefebvre (French, 1836 - 1911) Pandora, 1872
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prismolovesfanfiction · a month ago
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maybe Prometheus should've tried eating the eagle back
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evermore-fashion · 7 months ago
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Vesta (meaning ‘to dwell’) was the virginal goddess of hearth and home, family life and child-rearing in Roman mythology. She oversaw all aspects of home life, ensuring the sanctity of the house and securing its tranquility. Despite her seeming lack of mythological presence, Vesta’s enormous power over family, marriage, and children protected the moral integrity of all Romans. For this reason, all prayers and sacrifices began and ended with devotions to Vesta. She remained a virgin throughout her mythic existence, took no lovers, and bore no children. Vesta was adapted from Hestia (Greek goddess of the hearth) with whom she shared a mythological tradition. (Elie Saab Spring 2020 Haute Couture Collection)
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arnaerr · 2 months ago
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My old bachelor's degree project - Mensis. This is a series of 12 illustrations, each representing the personification of the calendar month inspired by the deity, which is connected with the given month to a certain degree.
prints and patreon: x List of the gods:
January – Janus
February – Februus
March – Morana
April – Tusholi
May – Attis
June – Áine
July – Demeter
August – Amanor
September — Žemyna
October – Velnias
November - Feronia
December - Ullr
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0thello · a year ago
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The Birth of Venus (painting), 1890
by John Bulloch Souter.
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life-imitates-art-far-more · 3 months ago
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Osmar Schindler (1867-1927) "Ceres" (1900-1903) Oil on canvas Art Nouveau Currently in a private collection In ancient Roman religion Ceres was a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships. Her Greek counterpart is the goddess Demeter.
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