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#physics
fuckyeahfluiddynamics · 4 hours ago
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Diving Together
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Two spheres dropped into water next to one another form asymmetric cavities. A single ball's cavity is perfectly symmetric, and so are two spheres', provided they are far enough apart. But for close impacts, the spheres influence one another, creating a mirror image. (Image credit: A. Kiyama et al.) Read the full article
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creativespacetime · 22 hours ago
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todaysdocument · 6 hours ago
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The moisture in the air around this U.S. Navy F-14 Tomcat condenses into water vapor as it breaks the sound barrier, 9/26/2002.
Series: Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files, 1982 - 2007
Record Group 330: Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, 1921 - 2008
Image description: An airplane, midair, appears to fly through the center of a circular cloud.
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physicist-in-training · 2 days ago
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23 September 2022
I’ve been really busy/exhausted lately, but I feel like I’m starting to find a good balance that is working for me! I’m fully back in person this semester, so it’s kind of a tough change. Since I have to interact with people so much now, I’m remembering that being a woman in physics isn’t just saying you’re a woman in physics. Some of my peers who are men are really patronizing and rude, and it’s making me sad lately. But I’m trying my best to keep my head up and stand up for myself. Sorry for the short post! I’ll try to keep you guys better updated on my studies <3
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art-of-mathematics · 2 days ago
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Two 2D perspectives of a 3D plot of a motion of a ball on a string with alternating string length - shaping a motion track like a distorted "8"...
I am not finished. It's a rough sketch/doodle...It may have errors as well.
I might go into detail at explaining how I find the 3d coordinate points via my pen and paper and imagination method. This is a bit tricky. I will explain it once my focus and ability to form coherent thoughts and sentences is better again.
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sub-at-omicsteminist · 2 months ago
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Is it me or does Jupiter in this also look like calcifer from howls moving castle
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thoughtportal · 2 months ago
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general relativity for babies
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sleepy-bebby · 3 months ago
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roversrovers · 2 months ago
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daloy-politsey · a month ago
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Reblog this and put in the tags what country you’re from and all the science classes you took in high school (for non Americans that’s approximately when you’re 14, 15, 16, and 17 years old)
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fuckyeahfluiddynamics · 8 months ago
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The Assassin's Teapot
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The assassin's teapot is a cleverly designed container that can pour from different reservoirs depending on how it's held. Steve Mould digs into the physics in this video, and he builds a transparent cutaway version of the pot to show exactly how it works.  (Video and image credit: S. Mould) Read the full article
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creativespacetime · 22 hours ago
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prokopetz · a month ago
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Okay, so here’s the pitch.
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shythecheesecake · a year ago
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I don't think we can 'lmao' our way out of this one, girls.
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mitchwagner · 8 months ago
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mindblowingscience · 3 months ago
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Jupiter's innards are full of the remains of baby planets that the gas giant gobbled up as it expanded to become the behemoth we see today, scientists have found. The findings come from the first clear view of the chemistry beneath the planet's cloudy outer atmosphere.
Despite being the largest planet in the solar system, Jupiter has divulged very little about its inner workings. Telescopes have captured thousands of images of the swirling vortex clouds in the gas giant's upper atmosphere, but these Van Gogh-esque storms also act as a barrier blocking our view of what's below.
"Jupiter was one of the first planets to form," in the first few million years when the solar system was taking shape around 4.5 billion years ago, lead researcher Yamila Miguel, an astrophysicist at Leiden University in The Netherlands, told Live Science. However, we know almost nothing for certain about how it formed, she added.
In the new study, researchers were finally able to peer past Jupiter's obscuring cloud cover using gravitational data collected by NASA's Juno space probe. This data enabled the team to map out the rocky material at the core of the giant planet, which revealed a surprisingly high abundance of heavy elements. The chemical make-up suggests Jupiter devoured baby planets, or planetesimals, to fuel its expansive growth.
Continue Reading.
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sleepy-bebby · 8 months ago
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Source 🚲
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