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#merry
evasartblog · 2 days
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The Fellowship of the Ring! I drew this for LA Comic con. Had a fun time this weekend. Thanks for everyone one who came by and bought a print! 
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imhkenobi · 1 day
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OMG OMG OMG OMG OMG
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house-ad · 7 days
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frodo-with-glasses · 9 hours
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Field of Cormallen Day 12
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But amidst all these wonders [Sam] returned always to his astonishment at the size of Merry and Pippin; and he made them stand back to back with Frodo and himself. He scratched his head. ‘Can’t understand it at your age!’ he said. ‘But there it is: you’re three inches taller than you ought to be, or I’m a dwarf.’
Finally, I get to show you guys this mini-comic in the poster! Merry is not tolerating Pippin’s shenanigans. Also, Frodo has new glasses!
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lordoftherazzles · 4 months
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Endless Lord of the Rings Gifs [38/???]
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sindar-princeling · 2 months
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between the newsletter’s entry where we learn the ponies are okay, me picking apart rings of power and analysing why it doesn’t fully feel like tolkien, and this one gifset of frodo and sam i reblogged, i felt like i finally have to gather my thoughts regarding what makes tolkien tolkien
and while there are many things that do, i’d argue that the most special one is its earnestness.
characters in LOTR care unabashedly, with all their hearts, and love so easily, whether it’s platonic, familial or romantic.
the hobbits feel like the most obvious example - merry, pippin and sam follow frodo for as long as they’re able; their loyalty goes deep to their bones, and their relationships are so full of trust, joy, devotion, fondness.
but all of LOTR is just more examples of the same thing. after the war legolas spends the rest of his life in middle-earth with gimli - they travel together for over a hundred years - and then he decides he won’t just say goodbye when gimli dies! and he does something that hasn’t been done before and just takes gimli to valinor, but not before aragorn dies. because they both loved him, too. faramir asks “do you not love me, eowyn?“ and she realises she does, and he says he’ll marry her and they’ll grow a garden and heal, and he kisses her even though everyone can see them. sam loves frodo, and he loves rosie, and he spends his life with her, then joins frodo in the undying lands after she dies.
and it shines through in the movies, too! it’s thanks to both the direction and the acting skills of the cast, of course, that so, so often all emotions are on full display - whenever sam and frodo interact, when aragorn kisses boromir’s forehead, when the hobbits say goodbye at the grey havens, when pippin finds merry at the battlefield, the way gandalf reacts when frodo says he’ll go to mordor, the way theoden breaks down at his son’s grave, the way he cares about eowyn like she’s his own child, the way eomer reacts when he finds eowyn and thinks she’s dead. those are just examples off the top of my head.
it’s also very special to me because in many fictional works (not only in fantasy) people just aren’t allowed to be that open - mostly men, but not exclusively - meanwhile this earnestness is something i always look for in fiction.
it stands out especially if you consider some fantasy creators (not naming any names but you know who i mean ajsjdjfjf) saying they “just want to reflect the misogyny of the period” (which is just bullshit and also demeaning to people of all genders in so many ways), because while LOTR is heavily male-dominated, tolkien managed to do something very, very interesting and important there.
he says, “war is the province of men”, but it doesn’t mean you’re supposed to want to be there. you’re not supposed to want to go to battle, suffer and/or die. eomer wants eowyn to stay home because he loves her, and couldn’t stand to see her die in a cruel, gruesome way (and when he thinks she’s dead, it’s the most devastating display of grief in the whole movie trilogy).
the heroes go to war because there are things that need defending, and dying for a noble cause is honorable, but again - it’s about defending, not about fighting. the clearest villains of LOTR are people who want the war to happen. many of the heroes, most of whom are men, just want peace for their people, want companionship (one of the first things aragorn says to the hobbits is that he’d be happy to have more friends, because being a ranger means he’s lonely), or want a good meal and a good drink like the hobbits. they want comfort and warmth. they want to finish a book like bilbo. they want to live in a garden among all things that live and grow like faramir. they want to marry and have a home and kids like sam.
and the things is, it’s not always that common in fiction, but it’s absolutely common, you know. IN REAL LIFE? BECAUSE MEN ARE PEOPLE? so it’s just really good to have tolkien absolutely divorce masculinity in his works from how his characters show emotions, or how much comfort they crave. and that is a realistic approach i’m interested in.
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youseeingthis · 9 hours
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eldamaranquendi · 2 years
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Lotr characters by https://guilhermefranco.com.br
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asaltysquid · 8 months
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“Where Evil Goes, Darkness Follows”
The og tiny kings. Another print for Calgary convention coming up!! Maybe I’ll even get the hobbits themselves to sign one for me 😤
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smhalltheurlsaretaken · 5 months
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I might have said it before, I don't remember, but while Return of the King the movie has its flaws (more so than the other two imo) no other film has ever come close to making me feel the pure relief and elation of the last half hour. I can't even put it into words. No other happy ending feels that earned, no other journey feels as long and as complete as this one. People can joke about the 5 successive ending scenes but I'd gladly sit through 10 more of those because it feels like coming home and home is heaven.
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borderland-ranger · 6 months
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The Fellowship of the Ring medieval style, by Sharon Williamson.
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house-ad · 7 days
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houndvoice · 23 days
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AU where Galadriel gave Boromir a sweet bulletproof vest
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Field of Cormallen Day 11
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The right-side wheel is done! Plus a little bonus doodle in the corner because I’m weak like that. :-P
And with that, the upper half of the poster is done! Now I can move on to the bottom half.
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tolkiensource · 8 months
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THE LORD OF THE RINGS: The Two Towers (2002) dir. Peter Jackson.
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wordbunch · 2 months
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while watching ROTK a particular sentence hit me harder than ever before and... It can all be narrowed down to that, basically: I know I cant save Middle earth, I just want to help my friends (Merry to Eowyn before battle) and that's really REALLY what it's all about - i mean the fellowship fell apart months before the quest was over but they all just... Kept going!! FOR EACH OTHER!!!! not to be The Hero, but to do what they could FOR THEIR FRIENDS!!! without even knowing if the others were alive FOR MONTHS!!!
GOD i just... That's really what it's all about. Frodo deciding not to burden the others and get rid of the ring alone. Not in order to be a hero, but to protect HIS FRIENDS. Sam going with him TO PROTECT HIS FRIEND. Merry and Pippin not going back to the Shire TO HELP THEIR FRIENDS even though they knew nothing of their whereabouts!!! Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli refusing to abandon THEIR FRIENDS after they disappeared with the orcs!!!
Nobody could have saved middle earth on their own. They just wanted to help their friends. And that meant everything.
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youseeingthis · 9 hours
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sindar-princeling · 2 months
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The previous post made me think some more about the real life influences on LOTR, so because I’m down with a cold and have a lot of time to spare, I finally wanted to write a coherent post about those comments GRRM made about Aragorn and his tax policy.
For those who haven’t heard the actual quote, here it is:
Tolkien can say that Aragorn became king and reigned for a hundred years, and he was wise and good. But Tolkien doesn’t ask the question: What was Aragorn’s tax policy? Did he maintain a standing army? What did he do in times of flood and famine? And what about all these orcs? By the end of the war, Sauron is gone but all of the orcs aren’t gone – they’re in the mountains. Did Aragorn pursue a policy of systematic genocide and kill them? Even the little baby orcs, in their little orc cradles? In real life, real-life kings had real-life problems to deal with. Just being a good guy was not the answer.
And my god, do I have problems with this approach to Tolkien. It’s kind of like asking why Bilbo was unconscious for a lot of the battle of five armies, when we know it was a story Tolkien was telling his kids before sleep.
When looking at LOTR, I think you can’t not read it as an ultimate escapist fantasy - and what’s most important, Tolkien’s personal escapist fantasy.
He is Frodo - a man born into a middle class family, educated, well-read, with close friends coming from the same “social sphere”, like Merry and Pippin, who died in WWI. Sam is in a very literal sense the batmen Tolkien fought with, which he said he considered “so far superior to myself”.
Tolkien had a few batmen during the war, like the article from my previous post mentions. Most probably because he fought in a few different units, but also, he may have lost some of them to war.
And in LOTR, they all get a happy ending.
Of all four of them, Frodo is the only one who can’t return home, most probably mirroring Tolkien’s trauma. He’s the only one whose ending is grounded in trauma, PTSD, loss. The rest of the hobbits get happy endings - very simple and traditional in a way that after the war was nothing but good - they marry, they have kids, the kids marry each other, everyone is happy and lives long lives.
Sam, especially, gets the happiest ending of all in this sense - he marries a woman he grew up with, he has so many beautiful kids, he is mayor for like seven times and everyone loves him, the Shire thrives.
Tolkien was too traumatised after the war not to write Frodo as a mirror of his experiences. But then he took all the people who fought alongside him, who suffered alongside him, people who he lost, and gave them the happiest fairy tale endings he could think of. And it’s not that Merry, Pippin and Sam weren’t as traumatised - this ending is not meant to belittle their experiences - Tolkien is simply giving them the ending that real life didn’t give them.
Returning to the original point, to Aragorn - it’s just another version of the same mechanism. Gondor was struggling, Gongor had Mordor as their immediate neighbours and was heavily affected by the war as well. And then there came a just, good king, and everything was fine. The end. It’s a subplot of the same fantasy as the hobbits’ endings. It doesn’t matter how hard ruling is, we trust that Aragorn is a good king, because people of Gondor deserve a good king (the people of the real world deserved a good ruler who wouldn’t drag them to war), and we know that Aragorn is an honorable, just man.
Nothing about the LOTR ending - apart from Frodo’s trauma - is meant to be realistic. Why would Tolkien want to write WWI and the aftermath - this time fictional.
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