Tumpik
#jenny sharaf
polkadotmotmot · 1 year
Photo
Tumblr media
Jenny Sharaf - 1138673, 2020
#up
37 notes · View notes
alookseeblog · 2 years
Photo
Tumblr media
Jenny Sharaf. 
19 notes · View notes
vansgirls · 4 years
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Artist Jenny Sharaf gives us a look inside her colorful world at her studio.
Photography: @MeganOElizabeth
30 notes · View notes
houseofvans · 4 years
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media
SOUNDING OFF WITH SIDESTRIPE SESSIONS ARTIST | JENNY SHARAF
The Sidestripe Sessions series features different artists across all genres ranging from punk, experimental, indie to hip hop all filmed in a giant Vans shoe box with a rotating backdrop of art installations. We recently got to chat with each artist to find out a little bit about their installation and vibe. We caught up with San Francisco based artist Jenny Sharaf to find out more about her colorfully flowing Sidestripe Session installation.
Take the leap.
Photographs by Michael Beck 
Who are you and what do you do? My name is Jenny Sharaf and I am an artist, living in San Francisco.
How would you describe your overall style?  I think my style is a little bit unruly-California-girl, classic and always authentic.
Tell us a little about the set you designed for Sidestripe Sessions?  I always love working with Vans. I’ve been wearing their shoes since middle school, and I don’t have to try to hard to make my work feel fluid with the brand. It’s a natural pairing. The Sidestripe Sessions set is an extension of my normal painting practice. I don’t always paint on wood, but really love to paint on just about everything. 
What was the process like start to finish?  I painted this in my friend’s backyard in Los Angeles. Painting outside is always a bit different, but it was a hot summer day, and the paint dried much faster than I expected. Showing up to see it installed at the Vans HQ a few weeks later was very fun, especially once the bands started to bring it to life.
What do you have coming up in 2019 that you can share with us? I am going on a world tour of sorts: Starting with a residency and solo show in Switzerland at Air Project Gallery and followed later in the March by projects in Tokyo, Beirut, and Amsterdam.  Feels amazing to finally be living out my dream of traveling and painting, almost like a skateboarder or DJ might go on tour. Also, just released a capsule collaboration collection with Stance as well! 
12 notes · View notes
ashobrien · 5 years
Photo
Tumblr media
36 notes · View notes
pastart · 5 years
Photo
Tumblr media
Jenny Sharaf (2013)
15 notes · View notes
shinebyseven · 3 years
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
San Francisco based creative and multi-disciplinary artist Jenny Sharaf talks to here and there magazine about her use of color, career highs, and the influence of 'La La Land,' plus spirit animals and guilty pleasures like The Real Housewives.
1 note · View note
sbowen · 3 years
Photo
Tumblr media
Jenny Sharaf If you aren't following #faultlineartshows you are def missing the goods #jennysharaf
0 notes
fangogh · 5 years
Photo
Tumblr media
Jenny Sharaf, Untitled (Ralph Lauren), 2017, Eleanor Harwood Gallery
1 note · View note
feimineach · 5 years
Photo
Tumblr media
face. Fifteen feminist artists respond to censorship of women's bodies online: Jenny Sharaf "Politics aside, this is pretty good marketing on Rupi Kaur's part. People aren't usually writing about poems and period art in the breaking news category." (l.)
0 notes
baralaye · 5 years
Photo
Tumblr media
Eleanor and accessories paired with Jenny Sharaf 👌🏾#colorcoordination (at Eleanor Harwood Gallery)
0 notes
polkadotmotmot · 1 year
Photo
Tumblr media
Jenny Sharaf - 1138613, 2020
#up
30 notes · View notes
alookseeblog · 2 years
Photo
Tumblr media
Jenny Sharaf.
9 notes · View notes
inspireif · 5 years
Photo
Tumblr media
Saw many good shows this weekend. Just a few... From top left, clockwise; Vik Muniz at #renabranstengallery, collaboration work by Tyler Cross and Kyle Lypka at #goodmothergallery, Jenny Sharaf at #eleanor_harwood_gallery, and collaboration work by Hughen/Starkweather at #electricworks. #art #artgalleries #sfartshows #painting #drawing #sculpture #minnesotastreetproject #oaklandartgallery
0 notes
houseofvans · 5 years
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
#YOURE IT:  5 Vans Artist Customs Edition
This week we’re sharing with you some of our favorite #vanscustoms from various artist ambassadors–such as Pacolli (SF), Michelle Blade (OR), and Mel Kadel (LA).  Each artist created their own unique Vans shoe using their original work and their medium of choice: watercolor, stickers, acrylic, and/or pen and ink.
Give it a try with your own artwork at Vans Custom Shop (#VANSCUSTOMS), and load up your own art to wear and share!!
1. Pacolli  2. Mel Kadel 3. Michelle Blade 4. Jenny Sharaf 5. Michael C. Hsiung
20 notes · View notes
courtneyhumanities · 6 years
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Gallery Visit Review For this assignment, I had the pleasure of viewing the Palo Alto Art Center with a friend. The show I visited was called Spectral Hues: artists + color. The featured artists were: Anne Appleby, Leo Bersamina, Omar Chacon, Freddy Chandra, Amy Ellingson, Eden V. Evans, Kristin Farr, Anoka Faruqee, Marguerite Fletcher, Stephen Giannetti, Mike Henderson, Karrie Hovey, Henry Jackson, Mitchell Johnson, Amy Kaufman, Keira Kotler, Richard Mayhew, Ron Nagle, Ruth Pastine, Mel Prest, Ken Price, Meghan Riepenhoff, Tamra Seal, Jenny Sharaf, Lisa Solomon, Victoria Wagner, and Nancy White. The show was focused around color theory. The work on display was a combination of many different creative mediums. Just some of the mediums I saw were paintings, sculptures, and other combinations of both. All of the art in this show used color in a unique or thought provoking way. At the beginning of the show entrance, they have a paragraph describing the show, and in one sentence they say, “Each color in this exhibition is used with purpose - to excite emotion, dazzle the eye, convey temperature, imply movement, or illustrate societal norms”. They explain, through the eye of the artist, we are able to learn, “the true nature of color and its power to transform how we see - and understand - the world”. I thought all of the art was really cool but there were certain parts of the show that really had an impact on me. One of the reasons I really liked this show, is the diverse uses of color each pieces had. The show had a nice ambiance to it as well, as a viewer, I could easily follow one art piece to the next without being distracted by something across the hall. While there was nothing I particularly disliked in the show, there were some pieces that mildly annoyed me. One of said pieces, is a canvas painted red with a slight gradient to the edges in a more black-red. While this did create a “What really counts as art?” discussion in my mind, it also created a sense of “I could do the same thing but not have it count as art”. One piece that I liked was a painting with lots of different colors painted in blocks. The paint itself had a lot of texture and layers which made the painting all the more interesting. The one piece that spoke to me was a painted and translucent acrylic sculpture. It’s called “Bask” and was made by Freddy Chandra in 2013. It looked like three lines of glass that had been painted just enough that you could see through it. I’m not fully sure why this piece spoke to me, but I believe it had something to do with the material that was being used. The color on the acrylic was not particularly vibrant, but it seemed to appear on the acrylic. In my eyes I believe this show was pretty successful. At first, we were the only ones viewing the show, but later others joined. I would recommend this show to others because it was really neat to see how different artists viewed colors in different ways. This show made me think about a lot of things. The most important question had me thinking what is really classified as art. I believe that each artists and person has their own opinion of what art is, but it is up to the individual to decide what it means for them. I would like to ask the curator why, at the beginning of the hallway, there is a wall full of art that seems to be drawn by kids. I would ask if it was intentional to compare that to the other artists paintings or if it had some other sort of meaning. Out of curiosity, I would also like to ask each of the artists what color means to them and why did they chose to use it in the way they did. If I were to capture my experience at the Palo Alto Art Center, I would describe it as a calming and pleasant experience, where I got to look at many different art mediums.
0 notes