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#historical clothing
cy-lindric · a month ago
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Louis, Anne, Philippe, Mazarin, Beaufort, and most importantly, Pistache
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dresshistorynerd · a year ago
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An Introductory Timeline of Western Women's Fashion
I think a good place to start to get into dress history is general overview of the whole timeline. Understanding especially how the silhouettes change is really important ground knowledge to build the rest of the information on.
I'll start the timeline from Middle Ages and go till the first world war. I'll focus on upper class England/French sector, so keep in mind that before 17th century there were huge regional differences in fashion inside Europe and class differences too. There is a lot variance, changes and nuance inside any century and decade I'm about to discuss, but I'll try to keep this short and introductory and very simplified. I used a very scientific method of basically what makes most sense to me to divide the periods. I've made sketches what I would consider to be the basic silhouette of the period stripped mostly out of the detail and then I give couple of primary source examples.
12th century (Middle Ages)
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Dress was simple one or more tunics over a chemise. They were overly long for upper classes, made out of straight lines. There were loose tunics often worn over another tunic, and tunics with laced bodice called biaut. In France bliaut sleeves often widened from the elbow, in England they often widened in frists.
13th century (Middle Ages)
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Clothing was mostly very similar as in the previous century, though bliaut was mostly gone and new popular style was a loose sleeves surcoat.
14th century (Middle Ages)
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Tailoring basically revolutionized clothing production, since clothes weren't made out of rectangles anymore and could be better made to fit form. Also functional buttons and lacing was popularized resulting in very fitted styles. The underlayer tunic, kirtle, became a fitted supporting layer.
15th century (Middle Ages)
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Improvements in weaving technology and trade and growing prosperity in Europe showed in clothing as excess of fabric and variety of trends. Houppelande, a loose A-lined overdress lined with fur and fastened with a wide belt under chest, became a very popular clothing item, and in later decades developed into the iconic Burgundian dress (the red dress). Fitted overdress continued to be popular alongside the warmer houppelandes.
1500s-1550s (Tudor period)
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In the renaissance era clothing became increasingly structured and elaborate. The bodice was heavily boned and the skirt was also structured.
1560s-1610s (Elizabethan Era)
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Both structuring and elaborate decoration reach it's peak during Queen Elizabeth's reign. She became the defining fashion icon of the late renaissance.
1620s-1670s (Baroque)
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In baroque era the bodice was still heavily structured, but more curved than the conical Elizabethan bodice. Otherwise though structuring was replaces with dramatic excess of fabric.
1680s-1710s (Baroque)
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In the late 17th century there was a huge shift in the clothing industry as mantua, a loose open robe inspired by Japanese kimono, came to dominate fashion. Rigid bodice was replaces by structured under layer, stays. Stays brought back the conical silhouette of Elizabethan era.
1720s-1780s (Rococo)
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Mantua developed into the iconic Rococo dress in France, robe à la francaise (first example picture), and in England robe à la anglaise with closed bodice. Rococo fashion was characterized by the wide silhouette of the skirt.
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Since Tumblr won't accept more than 10 pictures per a post I'll have to continue in a reblog. So to be continued!
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ophanim-vesper · 2 months ago
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FASHION HISTORIANS OF TUMBLR HEADS UP!!!!!!
What do you call this kind of sleeve
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1892 ballgowns
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hel-looks · 3 months ago
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Olli, 20
“I'm wearing Kiko Kostadinov boots, pants made by me, a vintage coat, a vintage shirt, and my wizard pouch and self-made huge fairy bag. My style is driven by having fun and creating characters with my outfits. I'm inspired by different fantasy elements such as wizards and fairies, and also historical clothing.”
2 June 2022, Mikonkatu
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in-herbones · 5 months ago
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Evening dress 1887-89. Cotton, silk
Via The Met https://bit.ly/3uvKscG
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montparnassee · a year ago
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Hot boy summer
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uniquekindoftrash · 3 months ago
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Uroš Predić (1857 - 1953) - Hercegovački begunci, 1889.
tr. Refugees from Herzegovina
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artist-ellen · 3 months ago
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Captain William Laurence
So I convinced my friend to read 'His Majesties Dragon'. So of course I re-read it too. Fingers crossed I can get them to continue the series so I can draw many more of these awesome characters from the later books as well. ;)
Laurence is a fantastic co-main character and to watch him grow over the course of the series is delightful! I've drawn him in ~1805 British Navy uniform, but with the "ugly green" color of the Aviator uniforms and a sort of harness. Harnesses being very useful when trying to climb around on a dragon mid-flight. It would have a chest/shoulder component as well, but since this is the not-currently-flying-but-could-in-a-pinch variation we're going with this being the "standard" uniform when not immediately on call. (and we're going to see a lot of it because the majority of important characters in book 1 are British Aviators)
Please don't mention any post book 1 spoilers (if we get there in the re-read I will be able to draw all the wonderful characters from the later books!!)!! I want my friend to go into the series as blind as possible ;D. Like to charge, reblog to cast that we'll get to the end of the series and I can draw amazing characters from all the books!
I am the artist!!! Don’t repost without permission & credit! Thank you! Come visit me over on: Instagram , Patreon
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iridessence · 3 months ago
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https://www.instagram.com/p/CdJ748sOswb/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=
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cy-lindric · 2 months ago
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My character for the TTRPG Noblesse Oblige. His name is Marius Cousin, he's a lackey and he's done possibly every job on earth before (including a bunch of crimes)
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dresshistorynerd · 4 months ago
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Sewing Medieval Bathhouse Dress
I'm a big boob person and for me bras have always been very uncomfortable. They never support enough even with the metallic wire support as the elastic strap is not secure enough and that wire curve is also just uncomfortable. My shoulders are also always aching because of the pressure put on shoulders. But no bras is even more uncomfortable especially if I have to do anything else than sitting. Which is why I have been considering testing out historical options ever since I got into historical sewing.
When it comes to historical sewing (and to some extent sewing in general) I'm still a noob and so I have been quite intimidated by stays and corsets and I've figured I'll start with medieval supportive garments, like kirtle, as they are much simpler. Then I saw the video where Morgan Donner made a bathhouse dress and I immediately wanted to test it out too.
Some history
Bathhouse dress is a garment that appears around 14th to 16th century in central Europe, mostly around Bohemia, Austria and German states and their vicinity. Perhaps the most famous finding of this garment is the Lengberg Castle Bra found in Austria.
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It's often called medieval bra because it has cups like bra. I think that's somewhat misleading as it was a full dress and this is just fragments of the dress. There's theory that there's only this left because the larger continuous pieces of linen were cut off and used for some other garment. The dress was quite different from shift, the usual loose undergarment that would be used under supportive kirtle around most of Europe at the time. It was sleeveless and tailored with lacing, usually on the side. The reason it's often called bathhouse dress is that there's a lot of depictions of it in bathhouse use, especially in Bohemia, and these depictions are sometimes referred as Bohemian bathhouse babes.
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All of these types of garments didn't have cups like this example from 1389 Bohemia, and there were a lot of different designs. There's different shaped bodices, some had waist seem, some didn't. In German the garment with cups was called breastbag at the time. In the literary mentions there was often degrading tone when talking about it, and it seemed that the writers at least thought women who used breastbag were "showing off". When have men not complained about women's fashion in a patriarchal society? Perhaps with the other designs there wasn't similar derision. The writings and some other depictions of the garment suggest that it was used more generally as an undergarment and not just for bathhouse. Which would make sense as it would seen uncharacteristic for Middle Ages to tailor a supporting garment (not cheep) just to use in bathhouses.
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Here's a potter wearing similar garment with different design from late 15th century Austria.
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Another one from mid 15th century Austria of a woman putting clothes on and obviously wearing the dress as undergarment.
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Here's a German example from late 15th century of a woman wearing it as a nightgown, which shift was also used for.
The sewing part
If you want a tutorial, go and watch that Morgan Donner video linked in the beginning, I'm not a good source on sewing, especially historical.
I wanted to make my version of the dress fairly historical, but I wasn't too concerned with making in exactly right as it's purpose is for daily use and not historical costuming. I hand-sewed it with historical techniques though, but the patterning part was quite chaotic and I basically came up with it as I went so there ended up being some weirdness in finishings as I didn't plan far enough.
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So here's how it turned out. I very intentionally made it much shorter than it should be. Most depictions have it reach half calf. I was making it for daily use and not historical costuming and I have a lot of knee length skirts, so I wanted it short enough for that. I actually made the bodice and skirt into separate pieces that are just loosely whipstitched together so I can use them both alone too, especially the bodice with trousers.
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The shape of the bodice isn't historical. The cleavage goes fairly high and is fairly straight in most of the historical examples (especially with the cups). Even the Lengberg bra originally had crochet covering the chest area. But again that wouldn't have fitted so well with a lot of my modern clothing, and my purpose wasn't historical recreation.
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As I was talking about the pretty weird finishings, here you can see them. The result isn't very neat, but it's fine.
I have been wearing this now a couple of months and I'm in love with it. It's much more supportive while being also so much more comfortable. The lacing on the side distributes the force around the waist, so it doesn't put nearly as much pressure on my shoulders. It's made entirely out of linen and is very nice against skin and as it doesn't have any metallic wires it also doesn't press anywhere. It also is just much more flattering than bras at least for me. It doesn't work that well without the skirt, the waist starts wrinkling and moving up, but the skirt keeps it pretty straight. The bodice is also slightly too long and it doesn't sit exactly on my waist, so it adds to the problem. It's not a huge problem though, it's just a bit annoying.
I'm planning to test out a version where I'll reinforce the eyelets with synthetic baleen instead of cord and put baleen in the other side too and maybe in the center front so I could use it as a separate undergarment without the annoying wrinkling. I'm also planning on doing 16th century kirtle bodice or the full kirtle (or both maybe as separate but attachable pieces, like with the bathhouse dress) with either stiff interlining or boning and Regency short stays. I want to test out different types of supportive undergarments in my quest for better bra options. Maybe after I've done them I'm ready to try Victorian corset too.
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thebibliosphere · 6 months ago
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Historical costumer friends--I know there are some of you out there. Has anyone got any experience with corsets from Redthreaded?
I've been looking at getting a custom corset for a while now. Primarily to help with my back issues and my POTS (compression therapy, ftw). I've only ever worn Victorian-styled corsets before and owned one that I had custom-made back in my early twenties, but my measurements have changed a lot since then, as have my mobility needs.
I now find the Victorian style too restrictive and it's been brought to my attention that I might benefit from some regency short stays to help support my ample chest area and also so my shoulders stop dislocating. (It's wild, the more stable my MCAS gets, the worse my hEDS gets. That bodywide inflammation sure kept a lot of things in place 😬.)
I've tried all kinds of (correctly) fitted bras over the last year, and I keep running into the same problems. The band area just doesn't provide enough support, so a lot of the load-bearing weight is put on my shoulders, causing subluxations and dislocations. The thin, horizontal pressure of the band also makes my ribs move around and actually resulted in a pinched nerve not too long ago that made breathing difficult and sitting up at my desk to work impossible (#just hEDS things 🙃). I can get around this by increasing the band size and decreasing the cup to avoid gape, but that puts even more strain on my shoulders and that's not great for my cranial instability/migraines.
I've worn my stretchy non-wired maternity bras to death, and they've served me well, but I really need more added support these days. The Readthreaded ones I was looking at are out of stock so I'm on their mailing list to find out when they come back, but I was mostly wondering if anyone has any experience with the brand before I drop $200 on some historical undergarments that are really not going to help the rumors that I'm a vampire.
I did find a couple of sellers on Etsy, too, but I'm hesitant to order something so expensive and non-returnable from there.
Also if anyone has any other store recommendations, please let me know! I used to know where to look for this kind of thing while living in the UK, but over here in the US I'm lost.
Please no one suggest making my own. I have neither the skill, equipment, or physical strength for such activities, and I need to keep my hands in good shape for novel writing. Thanks!
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1913 dresses
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hobbit--punk · 3 months ago
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I made some 18th Century underpinnings and wore them under semi-normal clothes to go out because fuck it, why not?
irOkay, so this started a while back with that one Bernadette Banner video about bringing back pockets as fashion. Watched it while I was trying to figure out how to restyle/resize a skirt that I loved, but was cheaply made and falling apart six months after I got it. And I knew that I wanted pockets, but couldn’t work out how to do that. 
Then I decided a while ago to make myself some 18th Century stays, pictures of which have been online before. I’ve written a whole rant on why I want stays before, and posted several blogposts about the history of stays. Not doing that here. When I made them, I decided to use some of the scrap fabric to make a pair of 18th Century pockets, the kind that you tie on under your skirts and access through holes in the outerwear. 
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Here they are, freshly finished. They (and the stays) aren’t historically accurate, exactly. They were made with some scrap linen/cotton blend I had lying around, and bound in bias tape I made out of some teal quilting cotton. Because teal looked damned good with that unbleached linen/cotton. 
And here they are, tied on over my stays and chemise. I figured out a really good rubric as to how big a pocket I make should be: if I can’t fit a paperback copy of Dune into the pocket, I need to make them bigger. These? They can fit Don Quixote. 
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Here they are once they’re on. 
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You can’t wear stays against your skin, and I’ve got exactly one chemise made of cotton muslin. For now. There are a few more cut out and ready to be sewn up, because you have NO IDEA how comfortable this was. 
You can also see if you followed that link that I’ve shrunk a little bit in the last few months. If this were a bra, I’d be looking at a different size. As it is, I just lace it down a bit tighter and go on with my day. If I gain a bit, which happens, I’ll lace it a bit looser and do the same. I’ve got two more sets of stays planned out as well, because this shit’s more comfortable than any bra I’ve ever worn. Also: back support. So much back support. 
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Adding my underpetticoat. Look at the slits at the hips, this is because I made it 18th Century style, I think it’s called “apron front?” basically the front is a drawstring you tie behind you, and the back is a drawstring you tie in front of you. The result is a skirt that expands or contracts with your body as you change size over the years.
It’s not even a “pattern,” per se. This skirt and the yellow one that’s following is literally just a bunch of rectangles sewn together with straight seams. My ancestresses didn’t have the money to waste lots of fabric on circle skirts, nor did they have the time to fiddle with weird seams. They had shit to do, much like I do now. 
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Yeah, the yellow one’s made mostly the same way as the underpetticoat. Two drawstrings, slits in the side giving me epic pocket access. The chemise peeks out under the tee shirt, but honestly, no one gave a shit, least of all me. I’ll make the next ones with shorter sleeves. Or I’ll make the sleeves longer and just go with it. Dunno yet. 
This is what I wore to go to the salon, do grocery shopping, and go out to lunch with my husband. No one noticed a damned thing, and the linen and cotton reacted as such materials do with heat and sweat to turn the stays into a snugly laced, supportive, REFRIGERATOR held over my torso in the first days of a Korean summer. 
Tagging some friends for fun! @balkanradfem​, @thinnyhopper​, @iridessence​, @hobbitinthelibrary​
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vestireltiempo · 9 months ago
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Enagua de 1900 (1900s petticoat)
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lgbtunis · 5 months ago
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Some fun with historical clothing ❤️ left to right: ✨ Dacian woman, 1st century /Norman noblewoman, 12th century / Andalusian Muslim woman, 11th century / Andalusian Amazigh Muslim upper class woman, 14th century ✨
Twitter / Instagram / Art Tag
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