Tumpik
#fannie lou hamer
fyblackwomenart · 8 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
⭐️ Fannie Lou Hamer by Allison Adams
 (1914-1977) Civil Rights Leader
Fannie Lou Hamer, a Mississippi sharecropper, changed this nation's perspective on democracy. She worked for political, social, and economic equality for herself and all black Americans. She fought to integrate the national Democratic Party and became one of the first Black delegates to a presidential convention.
She was also the youngest among 20 children and started field-work when she was only six years old.
She had a walking disability because of polio and had an eye blood clot after she was severely beaten by the police in a Mississippi jail when she was arrested, along with five other people, for trying to register to vote.
Most of her life she worked as a sharecropper or cotton picking where she also met her husband.
She was fired as a sharecropper when she tried to register to vote and spearhead voting drives as a co-founder of the Mississippi Freedom Society. 
She underwent surgery to remove a uterine tumour and woke up to find she had been given a hysterectomy without her consent.
“If I fall, I'll fall five feet four inches forward in the fight for freedom. I'm not backing off.”
637 notes · View notes
egalitarianchica · 21 days ago
Text
Nothing says pro-choice like sharing a quote by a pro-lifer 😂 Stan pro-life civil rights icon Fannie Lou Hamer.
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
85 notes · View notes
usnatarchives · 6 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Civil rights crusader Fannie Lou Hamer represents the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Methodist Church Ministries/Kenneth Thompson, online here.
Tumblr media
“NOBODY’S FREE UNTIL EVERYBODY’S FREE.”
In honor of Women's History Month (March) and Black History Month (Feb), we continue our celebration of Black women with this special virtual Kennedy Library Forum on March 16 at 7 pm ET. Register here to watch live or later.
Kate Clifford Larson, visiting scholar at the Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center, will discuss her new book with Karsonya (Kaye) Wise Whitehead, professor of communication and African and African American studies at Loyola University Maryland.
Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer draws on new interviews and fresh archival material to explore Hamer’s life and impact on the civil rights movement. Kennedy Library education and public programs on civil rights and social justice are supported in part by AT&T.
Tumblr media
Archives specialist Netisha Currie wrote about Hamer for the National Archives Say It Loud! Employee Affinity Group's Rediscovering Black History blog's Black History Basic Training series. Currie shared Hamer’s incredible history that included African American voter registration, organizing Freedom Summer, co-founding the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, and helping to establish the National Women’s Political Caucus in 1971.
Tumblr media
Governor Bill Clinton’s “Vision for America” speech at the Democratic National Committee (DNC), 7/16/1992, Clinton Library, NARA ID 18557458.
FOR KIDS AND EDUCATORS:
DocsTeach: Fannie Lou Hamer and Voting Rights: Students will analyze a portion of Hamer's testimony at the 1964 Democratic National Convention about registering to vote in Mississippi in 1962. They will answer questions to understand the specific challenges Black Americans faced, and the motivations behind the Civil Rights Movement.
Meet Fannie Lou Hamer: National Archives Comes Alive! Young Learners Program. Online here. Hamer (as portrayed by Sheila Arnold) shared her story from her birth as the 20th child of parents who were tenant farmers in Mississippi to her efforts to organize the Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and more.
Tumblr media
165 notes · View notes
blondebrainpower · 7 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Fannie Lou Hamer
125 notes · View notes
profkew · 5 months ago
Text
"You see, the flag is drenched with our blood. Because you see so many of our ancestors was killed because we have never accepted slavery. We had to live under it, but we've never wanted it. So we know that this flag is drenched with our blood. So what the young people are saying now is “Give us a chance to be young men, respected as a man. As we know this country was built on the black backs of black people across this country. And if we don't have it, you ain't gonna have it, either, ’cause we gonna tear it up.” That's what they saying. I don't see why they don't understand. They know what they've done to us, all across this country. They know what they've done to us. This country is desperately sick. And man is on the critical list. I really don't know where we go from here.”
Fannie Lou Hamer: 'The flag is drenched with our blood', from 'The Heritage of Slavery' doc - 1968 https://speakola.com/ideas/fannie-lou-hamer-the-flag-is-drenched-in-blood-1968 
35 notes · View notes
by-any-means-necessay · 7 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
57 notes · View notes
prolifeproliberty · 7 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977)
Co-founder of the Freedom Democratic Party and the National Women’s Political Caucus; helped organize Mississippi’s Freedom Summer; suffered arrests and violence as a result of her activism for civil rights.
Also: fought for employment opportunities for single black mothers, campaigned for maternal and child health programs, and supported her own adopted daughter when she became pregnant outside of marriage.
“[Hamer] was a delegate to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition…. There she spoke out strongly of abortion as a means of genocide of blacks….” - Ethel Payne
“Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer, a militant black leader from Mississippi and one of the handful of bona-fide poor invited to the conference, denounced voluntary abortion as ‘legalized murder’ and made it clear that she regards it as part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the black population of the Untied States.” - William Hines
61 notes · View notes
pagetwentyseven · 11 months ago
Text
And you see I couldn't tell anybody in my right mind that I am fighting for equal rights because I don't *want* any. I'm fighting for human rights, because I don't want to be equal to the people that raped my ancestors, dead, kill out the Indians, dead, destroyed my dignity, and taken my name. - Fannie Lou Hamer, 1970
130 notes · View notes
kykkyryzkka · 17 days ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
9 notes · View notes
akonoadham · 5 months ago
Text
20 notes · View notes
unkutraww · 24 days ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Fannie Lou Hamer
8 notes · View notes
odinsblog · 12 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Happy Birthday to Fannie Lou Hamer
113 notes · View notes
dreaminginthedeepsouth · 3 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Image: 'Angel Woman' by the fabulous Graciela Iturbide  :: [Tino Rodriguez]
* * * *
“nobody's free until everybody's free.” - Fannie Lou Hamer
14 notes · View notes
gregorygalloway · 12 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Fannie Lou Hamer (6 October 1917 – 14 March 1977)
66 notes · View notes
badatwritingstuff · 3 months ago
Text
Read-Together
Bell Hooks - Fannie Lou Hamer
Milan Kundera - Chinua Achebe
10 notes · View notes
geezerwench · 8 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Fannie Lou Hamer
30 notes · View notes
by-any-means-necessay · 7 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
30 notes · View notes