Tumpik
#edwardian fashion
sartorialadventure · 3 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
1908
6K notes · View notes
luxus-aeterna · 3 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
a close friend hosted a going away tea party in my honor, and I threw together different pieces in my closet/night gown drawer to make a turn of the century vibe happen. | IG
2K notes · View notes
fashionsfromhistory · 4 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Dress
1900s
United States
Goldstein Museum of Design
1K notes · View notes
Text
Tumblr media
1913 dresses
420 notes · View notes
squeakowl · 20 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Polished to a burnished glow, this c1913 gown has all the columnar elegance of a bronze statue. It was made by the Swedish designer Augusta Lundin to grace an early 20th century soirée.
(source)
359 notes · View notes
snootyfoxfashion · 9 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Edith Cushing Crimson Peak Dress Recreation by DressArtMystery
1K notes · View notes
empress-alexandra · 6 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Constance Markievicz - Irish politician, revolutionary, nationalist, suffragist, socialist, the first woman elected to the Westminster Parliament and the first female cabinet minister in Europe, early 1900s. 
511 notes · View notes
kittensbooksart · 4 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Perhaps some Edwardian sapphic vampires to go with the start of pride month?
It's a repaint I did a while ago of this one painting I did earlier.
359 notes · View notes
gogmstuff · 9 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media
623 notes · View notes
vestireltiempo · 9 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Enagua de 1900 (1900s petticoat)
928 notes · View notes
breebird33 · a month ago
Photo
Tumblr media
I needed... to vent...then it got away from me....
292 notes · View notes
sartorialadventure · 8 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Art nouveau tiara by Rene Lalique, ca 1903
11K notes · View notes
coffee-bard · 6 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
A lovely Edwardian gals commission from Twitter!!✨
145 notes · View notes
fashionsfromhistory · 3 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Delphos
Mariano Fortuny
1910s
Designmuseum Danmark
581 notes · View notes
dresshistorynerd · 5 months ago
Note
Hey! I love your blog!
I had a little question, if you don't mind: what kind of corsets would a lady would've worn while playing sports or doing stuff that would require her to bend or smth. I know corsets aren't the torturous devices they're made out to be but from what I do know, they probably wouldn't be the best option for when you need to be physically active.
Did they just skip wearing the corsets? Were there special garments that could replace it? Or were there special corsets made for such purposes?
Thank you, I really appreciate it! And thank you for the question, I'll never get tired of talking about corsets :D I will apologize in advance since I could answer quickly and say they had special corsets for sports, but I will go on a little tangent about all the different kind of corsets since there's more to it.
A little summary of different kinds of corsets
There were indeed a wide variety of corsets and most of themwere suitable for physical activities (even in late Victorian Era). I couldn't include everything here, but I'll highlight those I think are relevant for the discussion.
Corset developed out of stays in the early Victorian Era (somewhere around 1840s). Corset is just a different terminology for the supporting undergarment and doesn't really differ that much from stays in principle. Regency stays that were predecessors to corset were very much not restrictive. They rarely had any boning except in the front to keep the boobs separate and the stays from wrinkling. Regency fashion by nature concealed waistline and showed of boobs so the stays were very much only focused on that. During the Victorian era more boning was introduced to the now-corsets as the fashion started to emphasize the waistline. As the Victorian Era progressed forward the fashionable corset started to become more shapely with heavier and more restrictive boning. However this was only for the corset used with fashion items, things a rich fashionable young lady would wear for outings. Everyone wore corsets, the working class women who did physical labor too. Therefore by the late Victorian Era corsets started to diverge creating increasingly large variety.
So boning is the most well known way to give shape to a corset. Steel bones are the most restrictive ones, but they were usually only used in the front closure and thin steel bones often next to lacing eyelets to give them strength. Baleen was most often used for boning. It's made out of the same tissue as finger nails, so it's very bendable and soft. The main way Victorian corsets gained their strong shapes was the ingeniously engineered panels that when put together created a 3D shape. Softer kind of structure than boning was achieved with cording and even quilting.
Fashionable upper class corset
So lets look at some corsets! Let's start with the peak fashion. This is a silk corset from 1884. On top of the steel bones of the closure it has at least two steel bones on the sides and heavy boning otherwise too. The wide bones are definitely steel and the thinner are probably steel too, but they could also be baleen. This corset was definitely used to show of the latest fashion in high society gatherings and not for too much bending.
Tumblr media
The people who wore this were the same type of fashionable people who might tight-lace for high society events and this corset would be excellent for that purpose. Tight-lacing is what it sounds, the practice of lacing tightly the corset to reduce the waist measurements. It would be uncomfortable and in long term could have health effects. Most people didn't do it for long periods though, why would they when they weren't even wearing the presentable high fashions most of the day.
Working class corset
But as said everyone wore corsets (even men but that is a story for another post) and that includes housemaids, which was one of the most physically demanding positions for women. Symington's Pretty Housemaid corset from 1890s was made for that purpose.
Tumblr media
Symington's corset company, which was created around 1850s, was one of the first clothing companies to adopt the sewing machine for mass production, making their corsets cheap and easily available. By the end of Victorian Era they were the leading corset makers. They had a wide variety of corsets for "normal" people, working class and middle class people, so their products show well what most people wore. Pretty Housemaid corset was marketed for domestic servants and it was marketed as cheap and strong. Corset actually supports back and helps lift heavy things, especially this corset with it's raised back, which is great for a servant. The Pretty Housemaid has only very few baleen bones (only the front has steel bone) most of them ending at waistline, and the rest is just cording. This all makes it very bendable but still supporting so great for hard physical labor.
Another example of 1890s Symington corset is this corset with no boning (except front closure) and only cording and (interestingly) quilting.
Tumblr media
Morning corset
Most people wore corsets somewhere between these and the first example. Not all upper class people wore steel boning, baleen was for them the norm too. But those who did also didn't wear that all the time. Morning corset was very lightly boned corset that was wrapped around the body instead of laced. It didn't shape the body at all and only gave some bust support and a bit of the fashionable silhouette. Here's an illustration of it from 1890s. It was used by upper class women inside home usually during long mornings while getting ready for the day and could be used when receiving close friends and family in the midday/afternoon.
Tumblr media
Ribbon corset
Ribbon corset was very lightly boned corset made out of ribbons instead of fabric. It was an under-bust corset and similarly to morning corset it's barely shaping. Apparently it started as a night corset. You might wonder why would someone need a corset during the night, and it would be the high fashion ladies who wanted to prevent themselves from getting bloated during the night so they would be able to reduce their waistline without some time for adjusting first. It was used similarly to morning corset too and became even more popular in the Edwardian Era. Ribbon corset made out of cotton tape were also used for sports (at least in Edwardian Era).
Tumblr media
Health corsets
In the late Victorian Era health and exercise were getting more popular and fashionable, as were women's rights. Working class women had always of course gotten their excercise from physical labor, but it became popular for upper class women to be athletic. For example upper class women started cycling, ice-skating, mountain climbing and playing tennis and golf. This change has happening at the same time as the Dress Reform Movement came to existence. They aimed to reform the restrictive beauty and fashion ideals of the time. They promoted very successfully sports clothing for women. It was also a backlash to the increasingly boned fashionable corset. This backlash was based partly on the very righteous dissatisfaction with the extremely high beauty standards for women, but also on pseudoscience and men whining women being too vain according to them.
Tumblr media
There were men writing about how corsets will squeeze the internal organs and change their position and shape permanently based on literally vibes alone. It was mixed with fair concerns about tight lacing, though very much blowed out of proportions. This is where the myth of corsets being torture devices survives to this day. So many of the sympathizers of the movement started developing their own suggestion for the reformed corset.
Here's an example of a woolen health corset. With the focus on health there was also a ton of pseudoscience about it (as there is today). One of the claims was that using wool against skin was healthy. And there is a fraction of truth to it. Wool is anti-bacterial, but the claim was that it was healthy as oppposed to cotton and linen. Linen, which is also anti-bacterial. The corset itself is very lightly structured and looks very soft.
Tumblr media
The Edwardian corset was actually born out of the same ideas. The S-bend corset, or straight front corsets as they called it, was supposedly a health corset. I don't really know what they though made it healthier and I would guess it's based on as much scientific rigor as the claims about the health risks of the previous corsets.
Tumblr media
Sport corset
Promoting sports corsets was also a part of the Dress Reform Movement. Sports corsets really became a thing in 1890s. Here's an example of one. It's not shaping and merely supporting. It barely has any boning, if at all, leaning on cording instead.
Tumblr media
Sports corsets never really reached a wide use. They were a kind of novelty and trend. Basically any corset without steel boning was suitable for a lot of physical activities and so only rich people who had the extra money to buy corsets for every use and even used the heavily steel boned ones really even bought the sports corsets. Of course some physical activities (like housemaid duties) would need more bending room than a typical middle/upper class baleen boned corset would allow.
Several modern dress historians and historical dress enthusiasts have tested out their reproduction corsets for various physical activities and recorded them. Here's a video where Bernadette Banner tests out Victorian exercise routine with her 1890s corset. And here's another where Karolina Zebrowska wears full Edwardian attire, including corset, for bouldering. The tl;dr is that both were pretty successful experiments.
242 notes · View notes
yesterdaysprint · 10 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Bertha Baer, Junction City, Kansas, 1905
604 notes · View notes
liliavacyncosplay · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Speaking of white whale pieces, I found mine recently in a thrift shop: a vintage reproduction of an Edwardian lingerie gown for under $100. I think this is my thrifting peak.
88 notes · View notes