Tumpik
#d&d
cat-cosplay · 1 day
Text
Goblin Mode
Tumblr media
1K notes · View notes
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Herbarium Illustrations by Mariya S
988 notes · View notes
Text
Tumblr media
825 notes · View notes
redtallin · 2 days
Photo
Tumblr media
Rook - all ready for a D&D campaign! It’s been so long since I was able to indulge in designing a new D&D character for a game I get to be a player in!
He’s a Shifter and Warlock and I’m so excited to play him!
483 notes · View notes
Photo
Tumblr media
Why I don’t Use the Great Wheel Cosmology
For those of you who might not know, “The Great Wheel” is a name given to the arrangement and relations of planes that’s provided for the “default” d&d setting, and is assumed to be going on in the background of 99% of all published d&d material. It arranges the planes in a looping sequence vaguely based off the alignment chart, with wordily embodiments of the most extreme forces of good, evil, law, and chaos existing at the cardinal points. Souls depart from the material plane and are drawn directly to whatever plane most aligned with their alignment, to either live on in an eternal state or to become outsiders of their particular domain.
Over the years that I’ve run this blog I’ve stated time and again my distaste for the great wheel cosmology, meting out my critiques in bits and pieces as they were relevant to whatever I happened to be writing about at the time. This has happened so much that I wanted to collect all my gripes in one place so I could link back on it instead of reexplaining myself each time. So without further ado, brace yourself for an opinionated nerd telling you his in depth opinions about something that absolutely does not matter: 
The whole point of a cosmology is to describe the natural order/structure of the universe, and the great wheel describes a universe that’s effectively just the christian dichotomy of heaven and hell with a few extra steps. It’s a fundamentally moral view of how the multiverse works, and makes “right” and “wrong” not only into objective facts, but a geography you can walk across, travelling from the most morally correct place to the most incorrect place with just a couple of protals. 
This system is painfully rigid, not only removing any nuance over whether a course of action is correct, but preventing any competing worldviews from even existing: you can’t have differing belief systems/schisms of faith when you can go out and see proof of the rightness of the great wheel. Much like with how d&d handles gods, this paradoxically removes the idea of “faith” from matters of worship, which to me removes the whole point of having gods in the first place, reducing the big questions around death into a moral assembly line with one of a select number of pre-determined outputs.
It’s no stretch to say that the great wheel is just the alignment chart canonized as a fundamental part of the game world, and while we’ve all grown past the fundimentally black and white morality of the alignment chat It still mystifies me that d&d uses the great wheel as a piece of worldbuilding upon which most campaigns are supposed to be set. 
This boggles my mind because d&d has a much better and simplier cosmology upon which campaigns can be set, one that makes no moral judgments and instead allows for the infinite creativity that the game is supposed to be all about. The astral sea is an infinite expanse of possibility, where worlds are spun together from thoughts and dreams paralleling the process of creation that goes into the act of storytelling itself. What better way to explain a multiverse that functions on narrative tropes more than it does physics? Where hope really can prevail against wickedness and rule of cool supersedes the dictates of fate.
To end with a couple of personal gripes, the great wheel is really kind of boring? As a selection of afterlives about half of them are idyllic natural landscapes with nothing really going on and the other half are unplesant caves/wastelands suffering some kind of fucked up weather event. Most of it is painfully eurocentric when it comes to visions of the afterlife, and those planes that DO stand out ( The crashing metal cubes of Acheron) are more weird for the sake of weird. 
I can’t help but focus in on how much the great wheel doubles down on the game’s weird hodgepodge of colonialist belief structures. While WOTC has hastily amended out “always chaotic evil” over the past couple years, they still set their material in a cosmology where creatures like orcs/goblins/gnolls are born evil, drawn to evil all their life, and are doomed to suffer eternally in various hells because “evil” is in their very nature. This isn’t good worldbuilding, it’s the authors seeking some kind of weird vindication for their own beliefs by creating a group of people they can feel morally justified in punishing, and we all know where that gets us.
260 notes · View notes
thebeardlyben · 2 days
Text
Tumblr media
Since I haven't done much art of him yet since he is quite a new D&D character, here's Barny kneading some bread dough :)
352 notes · View notes
r00ib0s · 1 day
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
more sketchbook snippets of the bastard
patreon.com/rooibos
186 notes · View notes
Photo
Tumblr media
💍 𝗡𝗲𝘄 𝗶𝘁𝗲𝗺! Ring of Names
Ring, common ___ A thin strip of parchment lines the inside of this brass signet ring. When you shake hands with a humanoid, you can make a Wisdom (Insight) check contested by the target's Charisma (Deception) check. On a success, the target's name becomes written on the ring's parchment, which you magically learn. If the creature has multiple names or is secretive about its true identity, the written name is the one that it would be willing to share with a casual acquaintance. Regardless, a creature is unaware of this effect. Once a name has been written on the parchment, this property of the ring can’t be used again until the next dawn, at which time the name disappears from the ring's parchment. ___ ✨ Patrons get huge perks! Access this and hundreds of other item cards, art files, and compendium entries when you support The Griffon's Saddlebag on Patreon for less than $10 a month!
170 notes · View notes
dailydungeondelves · 2 days
Text
Tumblr media
181 notes · View notes
artcher-artwork · 3 days
Text
Tumblr media
Would you all be interested in Orc Stretches as a print?
161 notes · View notes
deerkick · 4 hours
Photo
Tumblr media
and it’s time for a few small repairs, she said sunny came home with a vengeance
135 notes · View notes
radio-silents · 1 day
Photo
Tumblr media
kismet got a ghost step tattoo
134 notes · View notes
youseeingthis · 9 hours
Text
2K notes · View notes
Text
Tumblr media
All the corgis!!!!!!!!!!!!! ALL OF THEM! I’d also make the corgis immune to all forms of damage. Just to keep the murderhobos from fireballing the area.
102 notes · View notes
bchangart · 3 days
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media Tumblr media
I drew my bunbun as a D&D character :3
132 notes · View notes
redtallin · 21 hours
Text
Tumblr media
Some more sketches of Rook - now that I've had time to flesh him out with our DM a bit more!
374 notes · View notes
Text
Here's an idea for a (perhaps overcomplicated twist) to a classic riddle/puzzle.
The room you enter has two doors. When you open one, you will perish immediately. The other will let you carry on your way. Between the doors and your party stands a lone sentinel clad in platinum armor. The sentinels explains the nature of the room when you enter and does so truthfully.
Your players can ask the sentinel as many questions as they want. It will answer those questions in a specific pattern of true and then false. However, if the person asking a question knows the answer already, the sentinel will change behaviors. It assigns each party member with either a true or false value that will determine if it answers those known questions truthfully or not. If it answers truthfully, the next answer it gives to an unknown question will be false and visa versa. If a question gets asked twice, it is treated as a known question for the asker the second time.
The sentinels is immune to the zone of truth spell and similar effects. Attacking the sentinel results in it vanishing and the correct door opening, though beyond it is the start of the same room with the sentinel in it (where it informs the party of the futility of this struggle).
To solve the conundrum of the room, players must identify this pattern of behavior and ask questions in the right order in order to discover which door will let them carry on.
113 notes · View notes