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#charlotte brontë
a-book-is-a-garden · a day ago
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I do not think, sir, you have any right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.
Charlotte Brontë, “Jane Eyre”
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resqectable · a day ago
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I loved him very much - more than I could trust myself to say - more than words had power to express.
Charlotte Brontë
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flowerytale · 3 months ago
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Charlotte Brontë, from “Jane Eyre”
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rini-descartes · 6 months ago
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quotemadness · 4 months ago
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I loved him very much - more than I could trust myself to say - more than words had power to express.
Charlotte Brontë
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derangedrhythms · 8 months ago
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"He is not to them what he is to me," I thought: "he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—
Charlotte Brontë, from 'Jane Eyre'
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mistressaccost · 25 days ago
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cross stitches by bothy threads
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nymphpens · 10 days ago
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a relationship should be 50/50 he locks her up in an attic and she burns his house down
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macrolit · a month ago
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Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong!
Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë
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thoughtkick · a month ago
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Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity or registering wrongs.
Charlotte Brontë
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penig · a month ago
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I have just finished reading Jane Eyre for the umpty-umpth time since I imprinted on it at 14.
Certain books I have read too often for too big a chunk of my life for me to ever alter my visual image of the locations and characters while reading, and Jane Eyre is one of them. However, this one out of all of them is gradually accumulating an Ideal but Impossible Cast List of actors who have never, and now never can, play certain characters, but should. Chief of these, of course, are Jane and Rochester. Rochester should be played by Jeremy Brett at slightly older than he played Sherlock Holmes, and Jane should be played by Gillian Anderson at 19, who could totally do the “drab little governess till she suddenly flares up” bit, with a few subtle shifts of eyebrow and half a lip. Today, a new one got added: John Hamm as St. John Rivers.
Because this is the first time since I saw the video adaptation of Good Omens that I’ve read the sequence in which St. John tries his damnedest to gaslight, browbeat, coerce, and lure Jane into marrying him in order to go to India with him as a missionary.
If you have seen John Hamm as Archangel Gabriel in Good Omens, and have read my Good Omens fanfic (which contains, I am told by a reader, the nastiest version of Gabriel in the entire fandom; no small feat for a character whom people have written as a rapist and serial killer), you will understand exactly how much I loathe St. John Rivers. He matches Gabriel’s presentation point-by-point, the self-righteous egotist who tramples all before him and thinks that being Great and Good excuses every bit of cruelty he indulges himself in; thinks, even, that because he never stoops to violence he isn’t cruel at all. When I was 14 it bothered me that he gets the last paragraphs of the book; now that I’m 61 it makes me almost physically ill. I want to shake Jane for all the excuses she makes for him. I hope he dies alone and is in Hell for half an hour before he realizes that’s where he wound up. I wish he’d met Rochester once, because even blind Rochester would’ve seen straight through him and stood a chance, if he could keep his temper, of cutting him off at the knees and shocking Jane into losing the scales on her eyes.
My opinion of Rochester has mutated a bit down the years - the implications of the age difference is much more real and meaningful to me now than it was at the time, for instance; probably more meaningful to me than it ever had a chance of being to Brontë, since she died so young herself. And the mad wife in the attic business is - really complicated and impossible to discuss without discussing historical methods of handling mental illness. But Jane made the right choices about him, right down the line. Of course she had to leave him after he’d lied to her and tried to trick her; of course she took him back after that tremendous ego of his finally broke down enough to let him change. Rochester and Jane have compatible faults, which are much more important, in marriage, than virtues, He in fact has many of the same faults as Rivers does, which explains how close Rivers came to winning. But he can love Jane the way she needs to be love, and no one will ever know if Rivers could, because he scorns to.
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oldshrewsburyian · 2 months ago
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I am about to embark upon reading Jane Eyre for the first time. Do you have any opinions/knowledge to share about the book? all I know about it is something-something-colonialism, something-something-locked his wife in an attic. So I'm curious what other people think about it.
AHHHHHHHH. Ahem. I am delighted to be asked this question. I have numerous opinions, and some knowledge. Colonialism and the attic are of course part of it, but there is A Lot Going On Here. I shall attempt to be brief. I shall almost certainly fail. Here we go.
I think both Jane Eyre as a novel and Jane Eyre as a character are really great. And I think Charlotte Brontë is doing fascinating things in the novel with how she examines gender, religion, vocation, class, and -- not least -- colonialism. In fact, I’d be very comfortable saying that the novel is attuned to the structural sins of colonialism (and, for that matter, patriarchy. And, not least, organized Christianity) in ways that many adaptations have not been. Colonialism + Jane Eyre would be a whole essay (it is, in fact, a whole subfield) so I’m going to focus on Jane herself here.
Jane herself (who can certainly, I think, be read as both bisexual and biracial, or either) is one of the most satisfying fictional women I know. Her sense of self and her sense of ethics are at the steely core of this novel. To quote her own words, she is poor, plain, obscure, and little... and she is also extremely intelligent and extremely passionate. I firmly believe that she and Rochester have the kinkiest sex of any couple in 19th-century English literature. And yes, that includes John Thornton and Margaret Hale. Jane is, from a very early age, full of blazing anger against all systems of oppression, and has a very clear-eyed refusal to pretend that injustice is anything other than it is. Several decades before Huck Finn, she tells a clergyman to his face that by his standards, she probably is going to his hell, and she doesn’t care. I love her so so much. She is intelligent and wise, and also keenly aware of her unusual, almost liminal social status. She’s been raised in a household of the gentry, but treated there as a servant. At her boarding school, she was raised from a pupil to an instructor. And now, with her skills in art and history and languages, she’s a governess: not of the housekeeper’s station nor of her master’s. Jane is a very solitary little figure, until she meets the man who says to her “here is my equal and my likeness.” Hot damn, I would also marry anyone who said that to me, even if I were not a 19th-century governess, but I also believe it is important that Jane has time to be independent, to be on her own, to make a full and useful life in which she is “not unhappy” (sob) before she comes back to a life that is not only full but rich: in which she can say of her husband “we are flesh of each other’s flesh and bone of each other’s bone,” in which she can be happy in her friends and her home and her own household as a place of the kindness and generosity and joy that she was starved of for so long.
That was a run-on sentence, but you take, I trust, my point. I have not said much about Edward Fairfax Rochester, broody misanthropic problematic science nerd, but I have a whole mini-essay on him here. There is also some really interesting stuff going on with Romanticism and spirituality and religion, and also nature. The book in its first edition was condemned as irreligious, and Charlotte Brontë had to defend it in the second: “Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last.” Go OFF Charlotte. Anyway... I hope you love the book. It’s one of my favorites.
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wordto-thewise · a month ago
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flowerytale · 3 months ago
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Charlotte Brontë, from “Jane Eyre”
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amatesura · a year ago
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Residual Haunting, Catherine Bertola
‘Residual Hauntings’ is a triptych of photographs originally commissioned for The Bronte Parsonage Museum, Haworth UK. The images are of the artist enacting domestic rituals and actions performed by the Bronte sisters - as described in written records held at the museum. The actions include pacing around the dining room table, running up and down the stairs and sweeping the kitchen floor. These ghostly vignettes reanimate the spaces of the Parsonage, recreating a sense of the movement that previously filled the room.
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quotemadness · 2 months ago
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Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity or registering wrongs.
Charlotte Brontë
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talaypuens · 5 months ago
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—  jane eyre, c.b.
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