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#andor spoilers
skyshipper · 2 days
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ANDOR (2022)
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aria-dnea · 1 day
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[cassian’s radicalization]
↳ "Tell him, none of this is his fault. It was already burning. He's just the first spark of the fire. Tell him, he knows everything he needs to know and feels everything he needs to feel. And when the day comes, and those two pull together, he will be an unstoppable force for good.”
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notpikaman · 11 hours
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sam-not-so-wise · 2 days
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@lucasfilm LET MAARVA SAY FUCK
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antikate · 2 days
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I am thinking some more about Andor this morning and what I’d call the muted fan response to this show.
I think it’s because a) it’s pretty heavy, and not in a ott operatic way but in a very “life under fascism is bad” way, and I don’t blame anyone who doesn’t find that fun given… the world? and b) it’s not a show with a lot of obvious ships (except for Cinta and Vel, who are canonically a couple but they’re side characters) and c) I think the show’s writing is so tight there’s not a lot of gaps to fill in fannish responses
And also yeah it’s Star Wars without Jedis or mandalorians or space battles, there aren’t many fun aliens or archetypal emotions. The cute robot seems to have an anxiety disorder. Characters die or are wounded in terrible ways and the show doesn’t gloss over that (compare Cassian’s deep trauma about losing his family and community to Luke Skywalker’s arc where he basically forgets Owen and Beru in about a minute, or look at how Bix is shown after torture vs how Poe recovers from being tortured by Kyle Ren). A character like Kino just… doesn’t get any narrative closure. There’s no time to grieve him, he just doesn’t make it. (If anyone has a fixit fanfic for that hmu.)
The show’s main antagonist is a bureaucrat who genuinely believes in her cause. She’s not a maniacal dictator like Vader, she’s a hard working girlboss fascist. Cassian, our hero, is a jerk, but not in a fun rogueish way like Han Solo. He cares deeply about other people but it’s buried under so many layers of selfish cynicism it’s hard to see. Diego Luna is a brilliant actor, and Cassian is so damn human and flawed and vulnerable beneath his shell that it hurts. It’s the story of a messy, piecemeal rebellion coalescing around desperate, flawed people. It’s the story of people who aren’t called Skywalker, the ones who don’t get to be heroes, even if they survive
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darthbooks · 3 days
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n0cea · 3 days
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notpikaman · 11 hours
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internetjulian · 1 day
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Andor’s prop design, and what it means to “feel like Star Wars” (scroll for pictures!)
I got this comment and wanted to paste my response here because I think it’s a fun thing to think about!
Also!! Keep scrolling for a bunch of screenshots of my favorite props and designs from Andor, along with some surface-level analysis of each picture :)
Here’s the comment:
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And here’s my response:
Thanks for bringing these things up because I think there's a lot to think about here!
It's interesting to me to consider where we draw the line when it comes to these things. Star Wars has always had technically impossible anachronisms -- time measured in Earth years, idioms that shouldn't yet exist, etc. I'm not necessarily arguing with you, because in the end this varies person-to-person. I just find it fascinating to think about what is immersion-breaking for some people and what isn't. Why might it be reasonable that they would invent the wheel before us, but not the light bulb, or a container for noodles? To me, the show strikes a good balance between the familiar and the fantastical.
The noodles, for example, take something familiar and modify it slightly to align with the Star Wars sci-fi look. Similarly to blue milk, which is just milk but blue, these are blue noodles, which are just noodles but blue! Even the cup that holds them is different: a unique pentagonal shape with metal screws keeping it together, as opposed to the four-sided box with a handle that we're used to. The show does the same with many of its props, from headphones to neckties. All similar, but different. Occasionally flirting with aspects of our own world without (in my opinion) crossing the line makes the show feel more authentic to me.
I think another thing to consider is that this show, moreso than any other live action Star Wars media before it, places a sizeable emphasis on mundane props and everyday objects: how they feel, how they sound, how they look up close. There's a great video essay by Thomas Flight that I recommend called "Why Andor Feels So Real" that gets into this a bit. I think that a byproduct of this show's fixation on the mundane is that we, the audience, scrutinize these props more heavily, leading to a break in immersion for some people that might not have occurred were these props in the background instead of the foreground. For me, it's a worthy tradeoff; I prefer the grounded worldbuilding and appreciate the detail in the props.
Finally, I encourage finishing the season if you haven't! There's a minor alien character in the first episode that I found charming, and there are some great alien designs later in the season. I agree that aliens aren't a priority in this series and that there's less of them than usual, but they're definitely in the show, and not just in the background! I suspect that the people behind the show are more interested in the intricacies of human performance than they are in the spectacle of animatronics and puppets, but there are still some very creative and convincing creature effects in Andor. Still, it's a very human-centric story, which I don't mind since I love this cast, and we've had human-centric Star Wars stories in the past. This also takes place during a time that the Galaxy is under a human-supremacist dictatorship. I predict that there will be more non-human characters in the second season as we see the rebellion form into something more structured and unified, but this is just speculation.
To me, the show absolutely feels like Star Wars, for reasons I mention in the video, but I don't disagree that the show has left some people feeling differently. Personally, I'd rather have an uncompromising vision than something that attempts to satisfy everyone, and the great thing about Star Wars is that there's room for many different types of stories, and I think this show especially opens the door for that aspect of this universe to really flourish.
And just for fun, here are some pictures of some of my favorite props and creature effects from the show (spoilers ahead):
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To me, these little guys are instantly iconic, and I love the way they're introduced. Potty humor? In my serious prestige TV show? It's more likely than you think!
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I could post a million fascinating details about Ferrix but the glove wall immediately comes to mind as really impressive worldbuilding. Work gloves are something we've seen in real life, but the way they're all out in the open here demonstrates how tightly-knit this community is. Everybody trusts each other, and everybody knows the routine.
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Vetch is a wonderful gentle giant and I hope we see more of him in Season 2. I like the way the show depicts subtle bigotry towards non-humans in the Star Wars universe: Vetch is here because he's a big alien dude, and you can read Nurchi as seeing him as not much more than that. Cassian, on the other hand, seems to understand Vetch's nature better. It makes for a fun dynamic, and a subversion of what we're used to from this type of scene.
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Blue noodles! They're blue!! Also, I love the headphones, which fit the retro-futurism of Star Wars very well.
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Space coffee mug! It's an interesting shape in that it curves outward near the bottom. The handle is also very high. Nothing too out of the ordinary, but just enough about it is different to make it feel slightly alien.
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The way Maarva looks at Cassian's old Kenari weapon to me evokes Obi-Wan looking at Anakin's old lightsaber in A New Hope. The hilt even looks vaguely lightsaber-ish. There are a lot of complicated emotions here.
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I really like the look of the communicators the corpos use. Feels very much in line with the production design of A New Hope.
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Space razor and space mirror. Love it
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These clothes-hangers look very interesting. The way this whole setup fits into Luthen's ship adds to its custom feel -- this thing is decked out. It's a 007 spy car, but in space.
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Stims like this have been a thing in Star Wars for a while -- Jedi Fallen Order comes to mind -- but in Andor they're tangible and intimidating. These aren't video game items, they're medical tools. This moment in ep4 where Cinta uses it on Cassian foreshadows the ending of episode 6, when it's used on Nemik to give him his final boost of adrenaline so that he's able save everyone: "Climb!"
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The usual Star Wars prop fanservice is recontextualized in Andor as rich people shit. Rich people love to collect shit from cultures they think they care about, and this serves as both a perfect cover for Luthen and a playful jab at easter egg fans.
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Space iPad. Love all the little details here, and how it's futuristic yet still feels slightly clunky and analog. The gold and white color scheme has a certain elegance to it, emphasizing that this is a luxury item meant to appeal to the upper class. The ISB use a similar prop with different coloring.
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Weird food! You can also see the cereal container in the background.
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Space cereal :)
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It comes out of this interesting, plastic-looking container. I wonder if the cereal comes packaged in it, or if Eedy stores the cereal in it. I'm assuming the latter; she seems like she would be very organized.
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An interesting watch. The glowing hexagon above what is presumably the time is reminiscent of the shape of the prison Cassian will be put in. This six-sided design is a recurring visual motif throughout the show (and the franchise as a whole) wherever the Empire is present.
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This guy reminds me of Maz Kanata. It's a really impressive visual effect. Not sure how much of this character is practical and how much is enhanced with CG.
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Space necktie and space ID badge. They both use similar clips.
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This is a great practical puppet. And what an interesting cup!
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Space steno machine. Very analog-feeling. Probably the closest we get in the show to seeing a real-life object in the Star Wars universe, although there still seem to be some subtle differences. The grill above the keys is interesting, I wonder what it's for.
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Everything about the prison workstations is meant to feel alienating and overwhelming. Diego Luna's acting sells this really well in their introduction episode, but the props themselves help by looking very harsh and unfriendly. There's also a sterility to this space that reminds me of a hospital operating room. The instruments hanging from the ceiling further invite this comparison.
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"Squigs" seem to be little worms that partially dissolve in drinks as part of a Chandrilan custom. Lieda later remarks that they're disgusting, to which Tay retorts that they're supposed to be. Very neat characterization and worldbuilding in just a couple lines. Great stuff!
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Happy to see this dude return from Rogue One. Love his design.
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The headphones used to torture Bix are terrifying. These could have looked like a torture device, but instead there’s a utilitarian matter-of-factness to them that’s oddly more intimidating. The red light is a simple but nice touch. In Star Wars, red = evil!
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A fun blink-and-you'll-miss-it alien design in the lower levels of Coruscant. There are some more aliens in this short sequence, but this is my personal favorite. That the aliens on Coruscant mostly reside here instead of the prettier upper levels show that non-humans are an underclass in this universe. The Empire wants nothing to do with them.
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This elevator sequence is entrancing for many reasons but since this post is about prop design, I'll just highlight the little bluetooth earpiece that Lonni finds in it. It's simple but it's neat. It also has a blue light on the inside that you can see as he's putting it in. Sci-fi!
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Finally, I love these guys and the way they look. It's nice to see robotic prosthetics be featured in a way that doesn't symbolize loss of humanity (the franchise has an... interesting relationship with that). I also love the gross-looking net that they use to capture Cassian and Melshi. It looks oddly organic, a bit like a big spiderweb.
That's it! There might be more, but this was already getting pretty long. Hope the formatting of this post was ok, I'm new to this website and still getting used to having the ability to post something longer than 280 characters. TL;DR: Andor good
Here's a link to my video about Andor if you're interested:
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And here's a link to Thomas Flight's video that I mentioned in my comment:
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peggystormborn · 1 day
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People out here taking "I've been in this fight since I was six years old" to mean literally Cassian is saying he picked up a gun straight out of Kenari kindergarten and hasn't stopped shooting since and therefore the whole show is a retcon. Based on that one line.
Sigh.
Y'all this isn't the story of a man suddenly, randomly deciding to join the fight. It's the story of a man just now realizing he's ALWAYS been part of the fight. What happened when he was a child, presumably the loss of his parents to the mining disaster on Kenari, THAT was the first step down this path. But the path was always, necessarily, inevitably, one of resistance. This is what Nemik was talking about. That's why Andor was his "ideal reader". He knew Cassian was one of the countless who have already been on the front of the rebellion without knowing or acknowledging that reality.
The man he becomes by Rogue One wasn't lying, he'd just become cognizant by then of what his story has always been.
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elwenyere · 2 days
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Okay, I want to talk about the Daughters of Ferrix - and about how the moment I knew the Imperial officers stationed on Rix Road were fucked was when that guy referred to them as a “social club.” 
It’s not only a demonstration of the arrogance Cassian and Luthen attribute to the Empire (the way they overlook what they think is beneath them, as both Clem and Nemik suggest); it’s also such a blinkered, gendered view of how power works, because in so many scenes leading up to Maarva’s speech, we’ve seen Jezzi and the Daughters arranging for Maarva to get visits from her doctor, to get meal deliveries, to get access to warmer housing. We’ve seen Brasso and Bix checking in on Maarva and taking care of her, despite, as they point out, the lack of any nuclear-family ties. We’ve seen the Daughters come to collect Maarva’s body and make sure her belongings are preserved for Cassian.
And that’s a key part of the power that Ferrix builds in the uprising on Rix Road: a part that the Imperials completely miss. It’s not oppression and misery alone that make people rise up; it also takes care. Before the first brick gets thrown, there are years and years of care.
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buckybarnesss · 7 hours
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i love how yellow remains a part of cassian’s color palette because i cannot be the only one who thought of this vest.
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the-linaerys · 20 hours
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He’s not a royal, a politician, a general, or a Jedi; he seemingly doesn’t have a family, a romantic partner, or friends. He’s absolutely an accelerationist and arguably an extremist; he’s definitely a liar and possibly a manipulator. He demands loyalty, reminding his cohorts over and over of the vow they willingly took, but considers every aspect of another person’s private life as potential blackmail against them; he’s loath to share information about his plans but maneuvers people as he pleases. “Has anyone ever made a weapon that wasn’t used?” he asks Senator Mon Mothma (Genevieve O’Reilly), and Luthen’s ruthless wielding of that arsenal against Imperial authority makes him the hero that Andor needs. In a world where compromise is ineffective and complicity is widespread, he reconfigures the morality we expect and accept from Star Wars’ good-guy protagonists. In Andor, Imperial fascism is a system that operates via sprawl; as young revolutionary and manifesto author Nemik (Alex Lawther) writes, “Tyranny requires constant effort.” And as Nemik also writes, “Random acts of insurrection are occurring constantly throughout the galaxy,” and resistance requires more than one family or one kind of power. That ensemble includes Cassian, a thief and mercenary; Mon, a politician working within the system to funnel money to the Rebellion; mission-oriented Cinta (Varada Sethu), who has no problem murdering Imperial officers; extremist Saw Gerrera (Forest Whitaker), who toys with anarchy and insists upon ideological purity; and the sons and daughters of Ferrix, who smash bricks in the faces of their occupiers. These groups are dissimilar in nearly every way but their shared rejection of the Empire and their shared connection to Luthen. Gilroy and his collaborators crafted a kaleidoscope of moral gray and put Luthen at its center: mentor and benefactor to some on his side, antagonist and rival to others. Luthen’s power is that he can move back and forth between those spaces, not just with various people in the rebel network but sometimes with the same people: with Cassian, whom he recruits for the Aldhani heist, gifts a rare and valuable Sky-Kyber crystal, and then marks for death so he can’t identify Luthen if caught; with Ferrix contact Bix (Adria Arjona), whom he cuts off contact with after the Imperial Security Bureau starts looking for Cassian; with Aldhani heist lead Vel (Faye Marsay), whose increasingly concerned messages he ignores; and with Mon, whose worries about the Empire’s tightening fist he dismisses. (“People will suffer. That’s the plan.”) But Luthen is as pragmatic as he is mercurial, and Andor affirms his strategies as effective. The Aldhani heist gives the Empire another reason to tighten its grip and further empower the Imperial Security Bureau, but it also inspires and emboldens everyday people: the prisoners who break out of Narkina 5 by working together, Saw’s Partisans on Segra Milo, who go against their isolationism to agree to assist fellow militant Anto Kreegyr, and the citizens who rise up on Ferrix after listening to Maarva Andor’s (Fiona Shaw) instructions to wake up and fight. “I need all the heroes I can get,” Luthen tells Empire informer Lonni (Robert Emms) when refusing to let him leave their arrangement, and his methods create them. ... While Luthen dropping his hit against Cassian does broadly resemble Vader’s choice to save Luke, the decision is distinctly different. There are no familial ties binding Luthen and Cassian together; instead, Luthen is going against his own self-preservation to make this choice, unintentionally fulfilling an irritated observation he made to Saw in the episode “Narkina 5”: “We’ll die with nothing if we don’t put aside our petty differences.” Endangering one’s own survival for freedom’s sake — for humanity overall, without religious or biological influence — is exactly what Andor is about. Skarsgård has little dialogue in the finale, but like that Luthen-transformation moment, this epiphany is all over his face as he listens to Cassian’s “Kill me or take me in” declaration and understands that he’s gained an ally instead of creating an enemy. Many of Luthen’s conversations play out like negotiations, duels, or, as Luthen himself says to Cassian, games: escalations that dare the other party to stop wasting time and to meet Luthen at his level of commitment. He’s killed before, and he’ll kill again. In most other Star Wars properties, these would be reasons to abhor Luthen and to find him unsuitable for the cause — think of the inflexibility of Yoda’s “Do or do not; there is no try” and what it implies about the intersection between moral purity and heroism. Andor, meanwhile, dictates the opposite in Nemik’s “Remember this: Try” and holds open the door to both the Cassians and the Luthens, the beaten and the damned, the people offered as sacrifice and the people directing the sacrifices. Who needs Darth Vader with a tableau as rich as that?
How Luthen Rael Embodies Andor’s Gray Side, another excellent exploration of Luthen Rael. 
Nice to see I’m not the only one who’s obsessed.
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damianwho · 2 days
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Maybe I just missed it, but feel like not enough people talked about how Luthen runs a literal Star Wars References and Easter Eggs You Might Have Missed store as cover for his double life as a revolutionary organizer. Something there about how empire is happy to commodify your nostalgia and your anti-imperial thoughts and sell it back to you. When you buy the B2-EMO funko pop, are you the lady who buys the dead language necklace? And, depending on your feelings about Luthen, perhaps even a self reflective critique of trying to make radical art with in the system it critiques.
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laz-laz-ace-pilot · 3 days
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I just think the depressed ex-prisoner and the anxious droid would get along.
(and yes, Melshi had fluffy slippers. He deserves them)
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kenziekugler22 · 3 days
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Behind the music of Andor
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boogieboba · 9 days
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I can’t believe mon mothma took the high road when figuring out how to deal with the missing credits. And of course by high road i mean framing her husband for a gambling addiction
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darthbooks · 2 days
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