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pensarenmusaranyes · 21 days ago
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pensarenmusaranyes · 22 days ago
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The way we laugh. At our own desires. The way we mock ourselves. Before anyone else can. The way we are wired to kill. Ourselves.
Deborah Levy, Things I Don’t Want to Know (via fleurjaeggy)
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pensarenmusaranyes · 22 days ago
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“That spring when life was very hard and I was at war with my lot and simply couldn’t see where there was to get to, I seemed to cry most on escalators at train stations. Going down them was fine but there was something about standing still and being carried upwards that did it. From apparently nowhere tears poured out of me and by the time I got to the top and felt the wind rushing in, it took all my effort to stop myself from sobbing. It was as if the momentum of the escalator carrying me forwards and upwards was a physical expression of a conversation I was having with myself. Escalators, which in the early days of their inventions were known as ‘travelling staircases’ or ‘magic stairways’, had mysteriously become danger zones. (…)”
- Deborah Levy, Things I Don’t Want to Know, from Political Purpose.
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pensarenmusaranyes · 22 days ago
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Deborah Levy, em Coisas que não Quero Saber.
[ID do texto: Quando a felicidade acontece, parece que nada aconteceu antes dela, é uma sensação que só se dá no tempo presente.]
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pensarenmusaranyes · a month ago
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Carcassonne, France 
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pensarenmusaranyes · a month ago
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pensarenmusaranyes · a month ago
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Nan Goldin, Heart Shaped Bruise, NYC, 1980
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pensarenmusaranyes · a month ago
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One major concession that Healey won, in the final negotiations before she signed off on the deal, was the creation of an immense pubic archive of Purdue documents that would ultimately contain tens of millions of unreacted internal files, including the company email histories of the Sacklers who served atPurdue. Healey made a point of speaking, on a regular basis, with families who had lost loved ones to opioids. They often felt a tremendous sense of indignation, but what they wanted, many of them told her, was not money but truth. In a fling with the bankruptcy court, the states had established the total cost of the crisis to be more than $2 trillion. ‘What we’re trying to do is tell the story, so there’s a reckoning,’ Healey said. To gather evidence and tell the story—the true story, the whole story, the story that had for so long been suppressed—had a value of its own. ‘We will never be able to collect enough money to account for the damage o this crisis perpetuated by members of the family,’ Healey pointed out. No amount of money would be enough. But at the same time, she continued, there was so sum the Sacklers could spend to erase the history of what they had done. Nearly a century earlier, during the height of the Depression, Isaac Sackler had told his three sons that if you lost a fortune, you can always earn another, but if you lost your good name, you can never recover it. Sounding very much like Isaac Sackler, Maura Healey concluded, ‘They can’t buy their reputations back.’
Patrick Radden Keefe, Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty  (via carbavor)
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pensarenmusaranyes · a month ago
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Doctors in Belfast had taken to prescribing “nerve tablets” - sedatives and tranquilizers - to their patients, many of whom found that they were either catatonically numb or crying uncontrollably, unable to get a handle on their emotions. Tranquilizer use was higher in Northern Ireland than anywhere else in the United Kingdom. In some later era, the condition would likely be described as post-traumatic stress, but one contemporary book called it “the Belfast syndrome,” a malady that was said to result from “living with constant terror, where the enemy is not easily identifiable and the violence is indiscriminate and arbitrary.” Doctors found, paradoxically, that the people most prone to this type of anxiety were not the active combatants, who were out in the street and had a sense of agency, but the women and children stuck sheltering behind closed doors.
Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland by Patrick Radden Keefe
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pensarenmusaranyes · a month ago
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Pain Sackler- Nan Goldin
P.A.I.N - Prescription- Addiction- Intervention Now.
Keep reading
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pensarenmusaranyes · 3 months ago
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pensarenmusaranyes · 3 months ago
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pensarenmusaranyes · 3 months ago
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L’ou com balla (“dancing egg”) is a tradition done in many towns and cities of Catalonia on the day of Corpus Christi. It consists of placing an empty egg on a fountain, so that the water makes the egg spin. The fountain is usually decorated with flowers, especially weaver’s broom and carnations, as well as cherries. It has been celebrated since at least the 15th century.
Video of the ou com balla in the Cathedral of Tarragona by blancabr on instagram
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pensarenmusaranyes · 3 months ago
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Doctors in Belfast had taken to prescribing “nerve tablets” - sedatives and tranquilizers - to their patients, many of whom found that they were either catatonically numb or crying uncontrollably, unable to get a handle on their emotions. Tranquilizer use was higher in Northern Ireland than anywhere else in the United Kingdom. In some later era, the condition would likely be described as post-traumatic stress, but one contemporary book called it “the Belfast syndrome,” a malady that was said to result from “living with constant terror, where the enemy is not easily identifiable and the violence is indiscriminate and arbitrary.” Doctors found, paradoxically, that the people most prone to this type of anxiety were not the active combatants, who were out in the street and had a sense of agency, but the women and children stuck sheltering behind closed doors.
Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland by Patrick Radden Keefe
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pensarenmusaranyes · 3 months ago
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Dolours Price
I am a republican, born and bred, as were my mother and father before me and theirs before them. I have no time for people who constantly change their position.
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pensarenmusaranyes · 3 months ago
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️THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT IN MEDIA (🧱) GATTACA (1997), dir. Andrew Niccol — and Brutalist architecture
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pensarenmusaranyes · 3 months ago
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